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Infinix unveils a new active cooling concept for smartphones called CoolMax
11:01 pm | February 26, 2024

Author: admin | Category: Mobile phones news | Comments: Off

As the performance target for smartphones keeps going higher, engineers have had to reach for increasingly more elaborate cooling solutions, including active cooling. Infinix has been prototyping a system of its own, dubbed CoolMax. This is built into a concept gaming phone, so it’s just a preview of what might come. According to the company, CoolMax reduces the temperature of the chipset by 10°C (50°F). The chipset in question is MediaTek’s Dimensity 9300 with four Cortex-X4 cores instead of the usual one. With the help of CoolMax and an AI management platform, Infinix managed to push...

Android’s February feature drop adds 9 new nifty features
9:29 pm |

Author: admin | Category: Mobile phones news | Comments: Off

Just in time for this year's MWC, Google is seeding new Android updates that could potentially make your life a bit easier. Most of the features leverage AI, while others are just enhanced functionalities of existing features. If you are on the road and someone messages you, you can let the AI-powered assistant summarize your incoming messages, even if they are from a group chat, and then offer contextual replies or actions. For instance, you can make a quick call with just one tap or simply send your route and ETA. The AI can also describe an online image, photos or a picture...

Oppo introduces Air Glass 3 XR prototype at MWC 2024
8:01 pm |

Author: admin | Category: Mobile phones news | Tags: | Comments: Off

Oppo is another major tech giant to announce a new product at MWC 2024. Today, the company revealed its future plans about AI and the new Air Glass 3 XR (extended reality) eyewear prototype. The glasses can access Oppo's AndesGPT model via a smartphone, providing a "burdenless" AI experience. The company obviously thinks pressing a button on your phone is too much effort and it's trying to do something about it. The Air Glass 3 weighs 50 grams and features a self-developed resin waveguide with a refractive index of 1.70. It has peak eye brightness of more than 1,000 nits. Oppo...

Oppo introduces Air Glass 3 XR prototype at MWC 2024
8:01 pm |

Author: admin | Category: Mobile phones news | Tags: | Comments: Off

Oppo is another major tech giant to announce a new product at MWC 2024. Today, the company revealed its future plans about AI and the new Air Glass 3 XR (extended reality) eyewear prototype. The glasses can access Oppo's AndesGPT model via a smartphone, providing a "burdenless" AI experience. The company obviously thinks pressing a button on your phone is too much effort and it's trying to do something about it. The Air Glass 3 weighs 50 grams and features a self-developed resin waveguide with a refractive index of 1.70. It has peak eye brightness of more than 1,000 nits. Oppo...

BenQ PhotoVue SW272U review
7:24 pm |

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets Pro | Comments: Off

27-inch 4K monitors aimed at pro and semi-pro content creation workflows are awfully common these days and span a wide range of price points. So, what makes the new BenQ PhotoVue SW272U stand out in this crowded segment?

The core panel specs look pretty standard at a glance. IPS, 4K, 60Hz, 400 nits, you've seen it all before. However, the 99% coverage of both Adobe RGB and DCI-P3 hint at something at least a little bit special, as does the guaranteed sub-1.5 DeltaE factory calibration. Actually, so does the pricing, which is rather high at around $1599 / £1199.

That pricing is particularly painful given this isn't a true HDR monitor. It does support HDR10 and HLG. But with that 400 nits peak brightness and no local dimming, the actual HDR performance on offer is extremely limited.

It's also conspicuous that monitors like the Asus ProArt PA348CGV offer seemingly the same broad specs and feature set for one third of the money. Ouch. However, the difference here is that the BenQ PhotoVue SW272U is pitched as a true pro-level display at a relatively low price, while that Asus is more prosumer or semi-professional. Whether the extra precision, features and performance this BenQ delivers are worth the money, well, at least in part that comes down to your workflows and requirements. 

BenQ PhotoVue SW272U: Design & features

BenQ PhotoVue SW272U in an office at Future HQ during our review process

(Image credit: BenQ)
  • Very solid build quality
  • Slightly dowdy design
  • Strong overall feature set
  • But limited HDR support
  • Great usability features
Specs

Panel size: 27-inch 

Panel type: IPS

Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160

Brightness: 400cd/m2

Contrast: 1,000:1

Pixel response: 5ms

Color coverage: 99% Adobe RGB, 99% DCI-P3

Refresh rate: 60Hz

Vesa:  100mm x 100mm

Inputs: DisplayPort 1.4 x2, HDMI 2.0 x2, USB-C with 90W power delivery

We’ve reviewed plenty of the best business monitors, and there’s no hiding it: the BenQ PhotoVue SW272U doesn't exactly turn heads for sheer design flair. For the most part it's a fairly dowdy all-grey display, albeit the slim bezels on three sides of the panel keep things reasonably contemporary. The stand in particular is very nicely engineered and supports height, swivel, tilt and rotate into portrait.

It's also worth noting that the shading hood bundled with the display and designed to reduce ambient light glare includes attachments for both landscape and portrait viewing, which is unusual.

BenQ PhotoVue SW272U in an office at Future HQ during our review process

(Image credit: BenQ)

Another notable design feature is the flat base with an inlaid leatherette pad. The pad itself is a little hard and feels cheap. However, the ergonomic benefit of the flat base is that you reclaim usable desktop space where conventional stands simply eat it up.

The 27-inch 4K IPS panel ticks the usual boxes for resolution, contrast and refresh rate for this class of display. However, the finer details place it in a much higher class than more affordable competition.

The full list of features is phenomenally long. However, highlights include 99% coverage of both Adobe RGB and DCI-P3 hint, sub-1.5 DeltaE factory calibration, a 16-bit LUT, both Calman verification and Pantone validation, plus support for 24, 25 and 30fps video to allow smooth playback with no jitters. Like several BenQ displays we’ve tested, these specs point to one of the best monitors for photo editing or other creative workflows. 

BenQ PhotoVue SW272U hotkey puck in an office at Future HQ during our review process

(Image credit: BenQ)

However, it’s not perfect, and not professional-grade. The panel supports 10 bits per colour channel, however that is achieved via 8-bit native panel support plus dithering. That's one measure by which even more expensive pro displays are typically superior, offering native 10-bit colour without dithering. Rounding out the specs are support for both Calman and Lightspace hardware calibration, along with BenQ's own calibration app.

As for connectivity, you get dual HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4 and USB-C with 90W power delivery. There's also an SD card reader and a dual-port USB-A hub. As handy as the SD card reader sounds, bandwidth to it is limited when using the USB-C interface to drive the display.

Final flourish is the hotkey puck. The basic idea isn't novel. Chiefly, it allows easier access to the OSD menu, plus three quick-jump calibration slots. The novel bit is that it's wireless and communicates over IR. That's a genuine benefit in terms of minimising cable clutter.

The puck also ties in with BenQ's Palette Master Ultimate or PMU hardware calibration app. One of the cleverer upshots of this combo is that, in MacOS, when you switch profiles with the hotpuck, MacOS automatically switches colour spaces to match. Nice. The info button on the puck is handy, too. That shows the current configuration information so that you can easily see what calibration you are running without the need to dig down into multiple layers of OSD menu. Useful if you regularly swap between workflows and calibrations.

BenQ PhotoVue SW272U: Performance

BenQ PhotoVue SW272U in an office at Future HQ during our review process

(Image credit: BenQ)
  • Beautifully calibrated
  • Novel anti-glare coating
  • Limited HDR performance

Make no mistake, this is a beautifully calibrated display. Out of the box, it's one of if not the most accurate displays we've seen. Colors are crisp and vibrant, but the balance is bob on with no hint of oversaturation, banding or really any calibration flaws.

Of course, this is an IPS display with a monolithic backlight, so it does have limitations. So, there's inevitably a degree of light bleed. That said, the contrast is about as good as we've seen for this class of monitor, albeit it's well behind an LCD monitor with local dimming, much less an OLED display. The viewing angles are also excellent.

On a related note, the SW272U has a new anti-glare coating design to reduce unwanted reflections even further compared with existing matte coatings. It genuinely does and without impacting perceived contrast. It's a definite will.

BenQ PhotoVue SW272U in an office at Future HQ during our review process

(Image credit: BenQ)

Less successful is the panel's HDR performance. With no local dimming and a peak brightness of 400 nits, this monitor was never going to be a true HDR display. But it's worth reaffirming that this isn't the monitor you want if grading HDR content is a significant part of your workflow.

However, what is impressive is SDR content rendering in HDR mode. As with every other mode, the HDR mode is brilliantly calibrated for both HDR and SDR content. In terms of SDR content accuracy in hDR mode, this monitor is perhaps the best we've ever seen.

Speaking of modes, the OSD offers most of the key colour spaces pre calibrated, including Adobe RGB, Rec. 709 and DCI-P3. And like many of the best monitors for MacBook Pro, there's also an "M-Book" mode, designed to match the factory calibration of Apple's MacBook monitors. 

Beyond that, you get the usual upsides of a 27-inch monitor with 4K resolution and consequent 163DPI pixel density. Fonts look crisp and clear, especially in macOS but also in Windows, and there's plenty of image detail on offer.

BenQ PhotoVue SW272U: Final verdict

BenQ PhotoVue SW272U in an office at Future HQ during our review process

(Image credit: BenQ)

The BenQ PhotoVue SW272U is an excellent monitor with one obvious problem, cost. Depending on how you look at it, this display is either very much worth the money or very hard to justify.

In particular, the Asus ProArt PA279CRV - our pick for best video editing monitor on a budget - makes for an uncomfortable comparison. That's another 27-inch 4K panel aimed at content creators. It matches BenQ's monitor with 99% coverage of both Adobe RGB and DCI-P3. But it cost one third the price.

What the Asus can't do is compete with the PhotoVue SW272U outstanding calibration accuracy or some of its features. For the serious content creator, it’s one of the best monitors for graphic design, photo editing, and video work. Features like the shading hood, hotkey puck and multiple calibration profiles can make all the difference to effective and efficient execution of workflows.

Likewise, compared to true professional class monitors, the BenQ PhotoVue SW272U arguably isn't that expensive. Ultimately, then, it comes down to the sort of content creator you are. More casual, semi-professional creators are probably better off with the likes of the cheaper Asus ProArt PA279CRV. But for really serious professionals, there's an awful lot to like with this BenQ. It's almost certainly worth the extra investment.


Pair the BenQ PhotoVue SW272U monitor with the best business computers - tested, reviewed, and rated by us 

nubia Flip 5G debuts at MWC 2024
7:22 pm |

Author: admin | Category: Mobile phones news | Tags: | Comments: Off

Foldables are slowly growing in popularity, and market share with more OEMs are entering the market. The latest example is the nubia Flip 5G which got its announcement at MWC and is the maker’s very first foldable phone. The device is identical to the ZTE Libero Flip which launched last week in Japan – featuring a Snapdragon 7 Gen 1 chip, 50MP main cam and a 6.9-inch OLED screen. nubia Flip 5G Flip 5G gets a 6.9-inch foldable OLED display with 1,188 x 2,790px resolution and a 120Hz refresh rate. The main panel is joined by a circular 1.43-inch cover screen with 466 x 466px...

Kensington SD5800T docking station review
6:41 pm |

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets Pro | Comments: Off

As someone who loves using laptops, I frequently face the frustrating challenge of needing more or the proper ports when needed. Depending on your needs, this lack of ports can slow down tasks and affect the laptop's usability. 

Now, with the standard moving closer and closer to Thunderbolt 4, while some devices are still utilizing the slower, though now standardized thanks to the EU, USB-C protocol, I have found myself with some of the best laptop docking stations of varying kinds strewn about my workspaces at all times.

Some of these docks are USB-C, and some are Thunderbolt. Some have a plethora of ports, and some are minimal. What's great about the Kensington SD5800T is that it sits in the middle of all my docks. It's powerful enough to run the majority of even my most complex setups, but it's also minimal sufficient that it doesn't take up a ton of space. It can run my Thunderbolt devices at Thunderbolt speeds, but it can also run my USB-C devices without any problems.

Kensington SD5800T: Unboxing and First Impressions

Unboxing the Kensington SD5800T was straightforward. The box was the docking station, a power adapter, and a Thunderbolt 4 cable were in the box, along with the appropriate documentation. Kensington neatly packaged all of the gear, and the included graphics on the dock made it so that I did not have to consult the paperwork to understand where to plug the Thunderbolt cable to run to my laptop (something that changes on almost every docking station). This unboxing was simple and minimal - precisely what I hoped for when I opened a docking station.

Kensington SD5800T

(Image credit: Collin Probst // Future)

Kensington SD5800T: Design and Build Quality

I care a lot about my desk's aesthetics - admittedly, perhaps too much. Anything I deem necessary on any of my desks/workstations must also fit the style of the workplace. For a desk to work well, it must also look great. Thankfully, the Kensington SD5800T is a simple dock that can slide under a shelf, mounted beneath the desk, or neatly tucked away.

Specs

Ports: 1x Thunderbolt 4 host port, 1x USB-C, 3.5mm Headphone Port, 6x USB-A, 2x DisplayPort, 2x HDMI port, DC power in, Ethernet, MicroSD slot, SD Card slot, 

Compatibility: Windows, macOS, iPadOS, 

Power Delivery: Up to 100W of laptop charging, 98W Certified

Overall, the shape, build, and construction are unassuming and can go unnoticed, which is the point of many of these docks. I rarely want a dock to be a focal point of a desk build. That said, I like the dock to be durable and capable of heavy work. There are days I am a lighter user of technology, though those days are few and far between. Most days, I push my devices to run many things simultaneously at high speeds and work immediately without friction. 

The last area worth mentioning regarding the design would be the port layout. In the docks I have reviewed, I have seen a fair split between putting the host port in the back or the front. I prefer the host port in the back, much like my desk, where I run my CalDigit TS4 Dock. However, on another one of the desk setups I use daily, I have a much smaller Thunderbolt dock with the host port in the front, which is visible. Host ports on the front are accessible, visible, and helpful if you plan on switching out host cables, have a reasonably modular desk (meaning you switch gear out regularly or change how you use the desk), or just like the look. The Kensington SD5800T has its host port in the front, so keep that in mind while considering this dock for your setup.

Kensington SD5800T

(Image credit: Collin Probst // Future)

Kensington SD5800T: In use

So far, this dock has stood up to the test. One of the biggest issues with even the best business laptops we've tested is the port selection limiting workflows. That's not the case here. 

I have been able to run an entire workstation through this dock without the dock taking over the dominance of the desk itself. The standout feature by far has been the seamless integration with any USB-C, USB-4, Thunderbolt 3, and Thunderbolt 4 device. This flexibility gives access to just about any modern or near-modern device. I can run my MacBook, iPad Pro, older iPad Pro, Windows laptops, and more all off the same dock due to its ability to host such a wide range of USB-C protocols. When working on bigger projects, transferring large files, or working directly from an SSD Drive, I have noticed that the 40GB transfer speeds work wonderfully. It's quick enough to work on most things from the drive (some video files still stuttered), and even if you are not working directly from the drive but instead transferring files, these transfers are quick.

My primary laptop is an M2 MacBook Air. For those who have M-series Macs and are trying to run multiple displays, you know I need help running multi-output natively. Sadly, unlike when running Intel chips, the baseline for the best MacBook Pro laptops these days are the Apple Silicon chips (M1, M2, M3). So, there is only an opportunity to output those laptops to a single external display. Only when you jump to the M Pro chips or M Max chips, do you gain the ability to multi-display on newer Apple laptops. That's where DisplayLink comes in. So far, it's the best way to get around this and output to multiple displays even when your laptop cannot natively handle this. However, the dock you are using has to have a DisplayLink chip integrated into the components to pair with the DisplayLink tool on your laptop.

Sadly, this dock does not have the DisplayLink chip. So, what this means is that the baseline M1, M2, and M3 MacBook cannot push out to multiple displays. It can, however, push a single 4K display at 60Hz. You can run up to dual 6K monitors at 60Hz if you have the Pro or Max series M Chips. For Windows, this dock can power up to four 4K monitors at 60Hz, a single 8K monitor at 60Hz, or dual 6K monitors at 60Hz. An ideal companion, then, for the best business monitors and the best monitors for a dual screen setup

Another element that makes this dock stand out (literally) is that it can sit horizontally or vertically on your desk with help from a base included in the box. For my setup, I chose to lay it down so it was shorter and wider. Positioning the dock this way also made it easier to hide it under my desk shelf. However, if you had a different setup, knowing that you could throw this dock vertically and put it in a different position could be helpful and potentially even a selling point for some.

Kensington SD5800T

(Image credit: Collin Probst // Future)

Kensington SD5800T: Final verdict

The Kensington SD5800T is a great dock. The biggest miss on this dock is the need for Thunderbolt ports, which reflects how I use docks and what gear I usually use throughout my day. However, this dock is fantastic if you don't need Thunderbolt ports but need USB-A, USB-C, Ethernet, video ports, and SD card readers. I currently use this dock at a desk where I do exactly that. My team uses this desk dock to edit SD Cards' content. It's an excellent dock for them as they can plug in their laptop, run one or two monitors, connect to Ethernet for high-speed uploads and downloads, and access the SD Card. We also have some additional peripherals connected to the USB-A slots. If you're looking for a dock for similar use, this is an excellent option, as it will meet your needs perfectly.


Kitting out the office? See the best standing desks and the best office chairs as tested by TechRadar Pro

OnePlus Watch 2 unveiled with Wear OS, stainless steel body
6:32 pm |

Author: admin | Category: Mobile phones news | Comments: Off

The original OnePlus Watch came out three years ago and it ran a proprietary OS. Since then, the company has gone back to the drawing board and has brought significant changes to the new model – meet the OnePlus Watch 2. It is based on a “Dual Engine Architecture”, meaning that there are two chipsets and two OSes. One is the Snapdragon W5 that runs Wear OS, meaning you have full access to the app store. The other is the BES2700, which runs a real-time OS (RTOS) at a low power. In Smart Mode, you can run Google Maps, Assistant, Wallet, Calendar, Keep, Gmail, you name it. There are 20...

OnePlus Watch 2 hands-on review
6:00 pm |

Author: admin | Category: Mobile phones news | Comments: Off

After a hat trick of failures, OnePlus is back with its newest entrant in the wearable space. The OnePlus Watch 2 is by far the most sophisticated wearable device the company has come up with yet which, at least on paper, should make it more resistant to the fate that befell its predecessors. The Watch 2 is a full-bore smartwatch running Google's Android-based Wear OS. But the real trick up its sleeve is that it runs a second, secret OS, complete with its own chipset, which is meant to handle low-level tasks and prolong the battery life. But more on that later. First, let's look at the...

Honor teases Magic6 RSR with 100x digital zoom, coming in March
5:25 pm |

Author: admin | Category: Mobile phones news | Comments: Off

We hoped Honor will announce the Magic6 RSR at the Mobile World Congress 2024, but instead, we got a short teaser and an announcement date - March. The video hints at the Porsche Design Magic6's special look and its signature "Flyline" accent. It also gives us a glimpse at the engraving on the underside of the phone's camera island, revealing the main camera will have an f/1.4 to f/2.0 dual aperture and that the phone's periscope zoom will support 100x. The Honor Magic6 RSR will be a maxed-out variant of the Magic6 Pro with largely the same hardware. That means a 1/1.3" 50MP...

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