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Smeg Professional Blender review
1:25 pm | May 17, 2024

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets Home Juicers & Blenders Small Appliances | Tags: , | Comments: Off

Smeg Professional Blender: two-minute review

The Smeg Professional Blender is a sleek, high-end appliance with an impressive array of functions: nine blending speeds, four presets, plus a Pulse and Auto Clean mode. It comes with 1.5 liter Tritan jug, a fixed blade, vacuum pump attachment, tamper, spatula, and cleaning brush. I tested one out to see how it compares to the rest of the best blenders on the market. 

This model is known by different names in different territories: 

  • US model: BLC01BLMUS Professional
  • UK model: BLC02BLMUK High Performance
  • Australian model: BLC02BLMAU High Performance

For this review I tested the UK model; note there might be minor differences between different countries' versions. 

Smeg as a brand is perhaps best known for its juicers and espresso machines, but it also makes a small selection of blenders – elsewhere in the range you'll find the entry-level Smeg personal blender and a mid-range Smeg jug blender. The model I tested for this review is the brand's high-end jug blender.

Unlike the brightly-colored and bubble-shape of the majority of the Smeg appliance range, the Professional blender is more sleek and subtle. It's powered by a 1400W motor, and has a row of preset buttons along the top of its aluminum and plastic base. These are then controlled via an intuitive LCD dial on the front. 

Thanks to the blender's slim design, it fits comfortably under kitchen cupboards, even with the jug attached. While its relatively low weight makes it easy to move around your countertop, and store. However, the fact the blades aren't removable makes things tricky when it comes to cleaning and getting blended food out of the jug.

Smeg BLC01 Professional Blender in reviewer's home

(Image credit: Future)

For this review, I used the blender to make a range of drinks and food, including a smoothie, a sauce and hummus. I also used it to crush ice. For the items that had preset functions, namely the smoothie and the ice, the performance was near-perfect. However, for the items for which I had to use the blender's Manual mode, the performance was hit-and-miss. For its premium price ($429.95 / £499.99 / AU$799), I expected slightly more consistent results.  

However, all things considered, the Smeg Professional Blender looks great and works well. If you can afford it, and especially if you've previously been put off by the bright designs of the rest of the Smeg range, it will be a decent investment that should last you a long time. 

Smeg Professional Blender review: price & availability

  • List price: $429.95 / £499.99 / AU$799

At time of writing, there are three models in the Smeg BLC01 blender range and the Professional version is the most expensive, with a list price of $429.95 / £499.99 / AU$799. For this price you get the blender base with a fixed blade, a 6 cup / 1.5 liter Tritan jug, a vacuum pump attachment, tamper, spatula and cleaning brush.

This price makes the Professional model significantly more expensive than other high-end models from the likes of Ninja and Nutribullet. In fact, many rival models, including Ninja's Foodi Power Blender system, offer a much wider range of accessories, blades and settings for half the price. 

In the US, the Smeg Professional Blender is available in black (BLC01BLMUS) or white (BLC01WHMUS) and is sold at Crate & Barrel, Williams-Sonoma, plus a number of third-party retailers. You can see the full-range of retailers on the Smeg website.

In the UK, the appliance is known as the Smeg High-Performance blender and it's available directly from Smeg, AO, Robert Dyas and Amazon. Its black model is sold under code BLC02BLMUK, while its white version is BLC02WHMUK. 

In Australia, the black (BLC02BLMAU), and white (BLC02WHMAU) models, plus an emerald green (BLC02EGMAU) version are sold as the High-Performance blender from Smeg, and Amazon. 

If you want a Smeg blender but can't stretch to the Professional model, the entry-level PBF01 Personal blender costs $169.95 / £109.95 / AU$199. It only makes single serve drinks and has just two blending speeds but it's more compact. Alternatively, the mid-range, 50s style Smeg BLF03 Jug Blender costs $299.95 /£179.95 / AUS $362. It has the same 1.5L BPA-free Tritan Jug seen on the Professional model, and a range of presets, but only four blending speeds. It also lacks the vacuum, and Auto Clean feature of the Professional.

With the Smeg Professional blender you're largely paying for the brand and style. The performance is solid, the range of blending options is good, and the vacuum attachment and Auto Clean features are welcome. Yet none of these are revolutionary. This does mean the price of the Smeg Professional blender is a little excessive, but at least you know you're getting a quality appliance from a trusted manufacturer. 

  • Value for money score: 3 out of 5

Smeg Professional Blender specifications

Smeg Professional Blender review: design & features

  • 1400w motor, 1.5 liter BPA-Free Tritan jug
  • 9 blending speeds + 4 presets, Pulse, and Auto Clean
  • Sleek design, but blades are fixed

Smeg is as renowned for the design of its appliances as it is for their functionality. The BLC01 blender is no exception. However, unlike the bubble-shaped, brightly colored designs seen across the majority of the Smeg range, the Professional blender looks much sleeker and more high-end.  

There are hints at the iconic 'Smeg' shape, but they're more subtle. The base has smooth, curved lines with either a white or black plastic panel on the back, and an aluminum panel on the front emblazoned with the Smeg logo. I was sent a black model to review and it fit in seamlessly with my other metal and black appliances and cream units. 

Inside the base is the 1400W motor which produces a max spin of 22,000 RPM. Below the Smeg logo is a circular dial with an LCD display. The power button is on the left-hand side of the base, and along the top is a row of buttons that each relate to the blender's different presets. 

From left to right these buttons are:

  • Smoothie
  • Green smoothie
  • Frozen dessert
  • Ice Crush
  • Autoclean
  • Pulse

In addition to these presets, you can manually select from one of nine blending speeds in Manual Mode. 

Smeg BLC01 Professional Blender in reviewer's home

(Image credit: Future)

Size-wise, the blender measures 16.6 x 6.6 x 8.9 inches / 42.1 x 16.8 x 22.5 cm (H x W x D) and this means it should fit comfortably under most kitchen cupboards, even with the jug attached. Adding the vacuum pump to the top of the jug extends its height to 20.5 inches / 52.1 cm. 

Weight-wise, the base and jug together weigh 14.5lb / 6.6 kg and this makes it easy to move around your countertop, or if you want to store it in a drawer or cupboard. It then has anti-slip feet on the bottom of the base, and a 3ft / 1m cord. 

Smeg BLC01 Professional Blender in reviewer's home

(Image credit: Future)

The jug slots on and off the base easily; there is no fiddly twisting or locking it into place like on most blenders. I was concerned it would move during use but it never did. A lid with a silicone seal slides on top, with a small, twist-off cap that is used to add ingredients mid-blend. 

When making green smoothies, or any drink where you want to retain the nutritional value of your ingredients, the battery-powered vacuum is attached in place of the twist-off cap. 

Smeg traditionalists may not like the sleeker, less conspicuous design of the Professional blender but I'm a big fan. It looks more professional and the small touches such as the smooth dial and discreet controls make it feel premium and closer in design to what I'd expect for the price point.

In fact, my only real complaint about the design is that the blades aren't removable. This means that cleaning the Smeg Professional Blender can be tricky, and somewhat dangerous. I couldn't guarantee that the jug and undersides of the blades were as clean as I'd like when washing by hand. Thankfully, the jug is dishwasher safe and the blender comes with a dedicated Automatic Cleaning mode. So this is a minor point.

  • Design score: 4.5 out of 5

Smeg Professional Blender review: performance

  • Didn't fully blitz kale or seeds 
  • Makes perfect crushed ice
  • Presets perform better than manual settings

With each of the appliances I review, I begin by seeing if I can navigate the different controls and settings without looking at the Quick Start guide or instruction manual. This gives me an idea of how intuitive they truly are and the Smeg Professional blender passed the test. 

The icons on each of the buttons are fairly obvious. My only confusion came from knowing what the difference was between the standard Smoothie button and its Green Smoothie equivalent. Pressing each of these presets brings the LCD display to life and it shows the blending time for the selected setting and an icon of either a single person (for Single Serve drinks) or a group of people for the Family Serve option. You can turn the dial to switch between these two modes before pushing the dial in to start the blend.

Smeg BLC01 Professional Blender in reviewer's home

(Image credit: Future)

The default time for a Single smoothie is 30 seconds. This increases to 45 seconds on Family Serve mode (other default settings are listed in the manual). You can, at any point, turn the dial to increase or decrease the speed. If you'd rather use the Manual mode, simply turn the dial (without any presets selected) to cycle through the nine speed settings. Then push to start.

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Making a kale, blueberry and banana smoothie in the Smeg BLC01 Professional Blender

(Image credit: Future)
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Making a kale, blueberry and banana smoothie in the Smeg BLC01 Professional Blender

(Image credit: Future)

For my first test, I made a kale, blueberry and banana smoothie mixed with almond milk. I pressed the Green Smoothie button, due to the presence of kale, turned the dial to select the Single Serve mode and pushed the dial to start the blend. The resulting smoothie looked far from appealing, but it tasted delicious. 

The texture was thick and slightly gritty, and I could see small flecks of kale floating in the drink but this didn't take away from the enjoyment of drinking it. I had worried I'd be able to feel the kale in my mouth, but the overall texture of the smoothie meant the whole thing went down, well, smooth. 

Making crushed ice in the Smeg BLC01 Professional Blender

(Image credit: Future)

Next, I used the blender to create crushed ice using the Ice Crush setting. This setting causes the blender to operate in short bursts for 35 seconds to crush the ice to a powder. It worked fantastically and created perfectly even and smooth powdered ice that was perfect for margaritas, or slushies.

Lastly, I used the Smeg blender to make tahini, before using the tahini to make hummus. I toasted sesame seeds, poured them into the jug and blended them at Speed 6 in Manual mode for 20 seconds, until they had a crumbly texture. I added olive oil and blended for a further two minutes until the tahini was smooth. I then added the tahini, garlic cloves, oil, lemon juice, drained chickpeas, a pinch of ground cumin and sea salt into the blender and blitzed the mixture for 10 seconds on Speed 4. I removed the lid, used a spatula to scrape the mixture from the sides and blended for another 10 seconds. 

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Making hummus in the Smeg BLC01 Professional Blender

(Image credit: Future)
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Making hummus in the Smeg BLC01 Professional Blender

(Image credit: Future)

After 20 seconds, the mixture had barely blended. I repeated the above step five more times – and even then there were still lumps of chickpea and an inconsistent texture. What's more, trying to get all of this mixture out from beneath the blades was difficult and I ended up having to wash a large portion away because it wasn't possible, or safe, for me to remove it, even with the provided cleaning brush. 

Smeg BLC01 Professional Blender in reviewer's home

(Image credit: Future)

Finally, in terms of noise, the blender averaged around 80dB on lower speeds. During my hummus test, this increased to 85db, on average, and during the Ice Crush test, the decibels soared to 95db+. On Manual Mode, Speed 1 produced around 69db, while on Speed 9 the average reading was 90db. 

From my experience, this blender performs much better when you use the presets than when attempting to make something manually. If you only plan to use the blender for these set purposes – smoothies, frozen desserts and crushing ice – I can barely fault it. If you want it to function closer to a food processor, you may be disappointed.

  • Performance score: 4 out of 5

Should I buy the Smeg Professional Blender?

Buy it if...

Don’t buy it if...

How I tested the Smeg Professional Blender

  • I used it to blend drinks and food
  • I checked the noise level
  • I assessed how easy it was to clean

I used the Smeg Professional blender in my own home for two weeks, making smoothies, sauces, hummus and crushed ice. 

I assessed how simple it was to set the blender up, how easy and intuitive it is to use, how well it performed different tasks, its noise levels and how easy it was to clean. 

I’ve been reviewing home and kitchen appliances for more than 15 years and have a wealth of knowledge and experience to draw on when assessing how well a product such as a blender performs. 

Read more about how we test.

  • First reviewed May 2024
Nutribullet Ultra blender review
12:38 pm | May 10, 2024

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets Home Juicers & Blenders Small Appliances | Tags: , , | Comments: Off

UK: view at Nutribullet.co.uk

US: view at Nutribullet.com

AU: View at Nutribullet.com.au

Nutribullet Ultra review: two-minute review

The Nutribullet Ultra is the brand's most advanced, and expensive, personal blender. Compared to the others in the range, it's more powerful, quieter, and boasts a touchscreen operation with 30-second and pulse functions, rather than the usual twist-to-blend approach.

I tried it out to see how it compared to the rest of the best blenders on the market right now. For this review, I tested the UK version. This model is also available in the US under the same name, and Australia as the Ultra 1200. (Note: there may be minor differences depending on territory.)

Overall, I was impressed. The lower-frequency noise it emits is certainly not whisper-quiet, but it is noticeably quieter than the model down (read about that one in my Nutribullet Pro 900 review). 

The 1200-watt motor and improved blade design worked as intended, blitzing ingredients instantly, creating silky smoothies and textured dips. It performed well for all recipes I was making, but I did have to intervene on occasion, with the ingredients lower down being blended smoothly, but those at the top never reaching the blades. On the occasions that this happened, I added more liquid and gave the cup a shake to get things moving again.

The design is still recognizably 'Nutribullet', but an updated version, complete with a glowing interface that only comes alive when the cup is clicked onto the base. Press the solid circle icon for a 30-second blitz, or hold the dashed circle to pulse. Although cool to look at, I found these controls a little too sensitive – I had to make sure my fingers didn’t accidentally touch them when I was putting the cup on the base.

At ticket price it costs $149.99 / £149.99 / AU$189.95, but there are discounts to be have if you buy at the right time. It's the priciest individual Nutribullet blender, but it looks and feels premium, and I think the upgrades are worth the expense. Read on for my full Nutribullet Ultra review. 

Nutribullet Ultra review: price & availability

  • List price: $149.99 / £149.99 / AU$189.95
  • Launch date: 2023
  • Availability: worldwide 

Nutribullet sells a wide range of personal blenders, jug blenders, food processors and juicers. The cheapest option, the Nutribullet Go portable blender, costs from $15.99 / £29.99, but the Nutribullet Ultra is the brand’s premium blender, and more expensive. At list price, it's $149.99 / £149.99 / AU$189.95, although at time of writing, discounts were available in some territories. At the time of writing, you can purchase it direct from Nutribullet, or via third party retailers like Amazon.

I think its price is reasonable for a personal blender that has a high-end finish. It feels well-made and the improvements over the rest of the Nutribullet range feel worth the extra investment. The blade is designed to last longer than an entry-level Nutribullet blender, so you could be making savings in the longer term, too. 

  • Value for money score: 4.5 out of 5

Nutribullet Ultra review: design

  • Redesigned 'Rapid Extractor Blade' for fast and effective blending
  • Includes two Tritan Renew cups, made from 50% recycled materials 
  • Stylish glow interface for pulsing and blending 

The Nutribullet is very easy on the eye. It comes with a sophisticated graphite finish base with touch interface (other personal Nutribullets don't have this), and it looks high-end on the countertop. Suction cup feet stop it from shifting about when in use. Setting up the Nutribullet is easy and intuitive – all the parts twist or click into place nicely.

It comes with a 1200-watt motor and a ‘Rapid Extractor’ blade, with a stainless-steel platform and titanium coating. This is designed to increase longevity of the blade – Nutribullet says it'll last for up to five years – as well as ensuring your blends are fast and effective. This blade is sharp, so you’ll need to take care when washing it, but its design makes it very effective at breaking up ingredients. 

Nutribullet Ultra blender in reviewer's kitchen

(Image credit: Future)

The included cups both come with to-go lids, which is great for smoothie-lovers who want to just blend and go, without having to decant to another container. They are at the larger end of Nutribullet's range – you don't get the single-serve 'Short' cup (18oz / 511ml), but you do get the 'Tall' (24oz / 680ml) and 'Oversized' (32oz / 900ml) cups. That's good news if you want to tackle larger blending jobs, but you can purchase all cups separately, so it shouldn't be a decision-maker when choosing which Nutribullet to go for. 

Cleaning

In terms of cleaning, the cups and blade are dishwasher-safe. However, it's worth rinsing everything off immediately after use, because if you leave food to dry on the blade, it can be tricky to get off. There have been times when I haven’t rinsed the cups before popping them in the dishwasher and they’ve come out dry with caked-on pancake mixture residue left on the inside, and the inner nooks and crannies of the blades are tricky to get into if food gets dried on, too (a small brush would be useful for this).   

  • Design score: 4.5 out of 5

Nutribullet Ultra review: performance

  • Quieter in operation than your average blender 
  • Excellent for smoothies and hummus, struggled a little with ice
  • Food can get stuck to the sides

The Nutribullet Ultra is one of the most satisfying personal blenders I’ve tried. It looks and feels premium, and this is reflected in the performance too. To give it a good trial, I made both homemade humus and a berry smoothie to see how well it could blend to a smooth finish and pulse for a more textured finish. The berries were frozen to get a good indicator of how well it crushes frozen ingredients, but I also tested it to see how well it could grind a batch of ice cubes too. 

Nutribullet highlights how quiet this blender is. While it's not something you’d want to turn on next to a sleeping baby, I did find the Nutribullet noticeably quieter in operation compared to other blenders I've tested. While making a berry smoothie on the 30-second blend setting I measured it at an average of 88.9 decibels using the Decibel Meter App. Comparatively, I measured the Nutribullet 1200 Pro+ at around 93.3 decibels on a similar blend, and my Ninja 3 in 1 Food Processor with Auto-IQ at a lofty 99 decibels.

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Nutribullet Ultra blender in reviewer's kitchen

(Image credit: Future)
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Nutribullet Ultra blender in reviewer's kitchen

(Image credit: Future)
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Nutribullet Ultra blender in reviewer's kitchen

(Image credit: Future)

I adapted Nutribullet's own recipe for Easy Hummus to see how well the Ultra performs when tackling chunky chickpeas, garlic and combining them with smoother ingredients such as tahini and oil. Unlike other Nutribullets I’ve tried, which start blending when you twist the cup and into place, the Ultra waits for you to press the start buttons before it turns on. If, like me, you’re someone who likes to go at their own pace when prepping in the kitchen, this is something you’ll no doubt appreciate. 

The blender has a ‘glow interface’ and the two touchscreen buttons appear when you click the cups into place on the base. It’s worth noting that the buttons are quite sensitive and I did find myself accidentally starting the blender on the odd occasion. The main blend setting only runs for 30 seconds, however, so if you do accidentally press it, it won’t run for long and is easy to stop. 

On my first go, the chickpeas got stuck at the top of the cup and I realized I hadn’t included enough liquid for it to blend effectively. After adding a bit more oil and a splash of water, I was able to tap the pulse setting to create short, intermittent pulses until the humus reached the semi-smooth texture I was aiming for. 

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Nutribullet Ultra blender in reviewer's kitchen

(Image credit: Future)
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Nutribullet Ultra blender in reviewer's kitchen

(Image credit: Future)
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Nutribullet Ultra blender in reviewer's kitchen

(Image credit: Future)

Next up, I made a Triple Berry Smoothie using frozen berries, almond milk, nut butter and banana. I popped in all the ingredients and pressed the blend button, which whizzed for 30 seconds. I made sure I put in enough liquid to stop the frozen berries getting stuck, although the spoonful of peanut butter wasn’t playing ball and got stuck to the side of the cup. I managed to scrape this off the side (unfortunately there’s no spatula in the kit) and pressed blend for another 30 seconds. The result was a super silky smoothie, with all the berries nicely broken down. 

Nutribullet Ultra blender in reviewer's kitchen

(Image credit: Future)

Finally, I filled the larger 900ml cup with a batch of ice to see how well the device could handle frozen cubes. I pressed the start button and within 30 seconds of blending only the base of the cup had managed to crush any ice. I gave it a shake, but the ice wouldn’t move, so a little water was needed to loosen the ice and ensure all the ice got crushed. 

  • Performance score: 4.5 out of 5

How do the Nutribullet personal blenders compare?

Should you buy the Nutribullet Ultra?

Buy it if...

You want a fast and quiet blender 

The 1200-Watt motor and base on the Nutribullet Ultra is designed to operate at a lower sound frequency. While it’s not completely silent, it’s one of the less offensive designs I’ve tried in terms of noise levels. 

You want to make smoothies for two

The Nutribullet Ultra comes with both a 900ml and a 700ml cup, which each have 'to-go' lids. A generous smoothie serving is around 300ml, so you've got room for two and blending space in there. Alternatively, one mega protein shake. 

You want a blender that looks stylish on the worktop

With its streamlined charcoal grey finish and touch interface, the Nutribullet Ultra looks and feels premium. Rather than hiding it away in the cupboard after use, it’s a design you’ll be happy to keep on display on the countertop.

Don't buy it if...

You're on a budget 

There are cheaper Nutribullet blenders available if you're happy to sacrifice the fancy touch interface, extra power and quieter motor. The original Nutribullet 600, for example.  

You want simple and fast control  

Other Nutribullet blenders start blending as soon as they're twisted into place, but the Ultra has two control buttons. This is a pro or con depending on how simple you want the blending process to be.  

How I tested the Nutribullet Ultra

I have tested an array of blenders before, including the Nutribullet 900, and know what makes for a good design – be it a personal blender or a traditional jug blender. To get a good feel for the Nutribullet Ultra, I used it to make a smoothie and dip. I was keen to see how well the hard ingredients such as chickpeas and cold ingredients such as ice and berries could combine in their respective recipes. The Nutribullet Ultra claims to have optimised blades for quieter blending so I also measured its noise levels using the Decibel Meter App on my phone to see just how quiet it can perform. Finally, I wanted to know whether the device was easy to maintain and so I washed each part after use and wiped down the base.

Read more about how we test

First reviewed May 2024

Breville the All in One stick mixer review: the best foundational kitchen appliance for home cooks
7:34 am | October 13, 2023

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets Home Juicers & Blenders Small Appliances | Tags: , | Comments: Off

Breville the All in One: One-Minute Review

Anyone who enjoys a bit of kitchen craft knows just how useful a food processor can be for boosting your culinary skills. However, if you don't get into the kitchen often, it’s the kind of thing that's not necessarily top of mind, something that takes up a lot of space. If that describes you, you're probably better off with a more lightweight solution like the Breville All in One stick mixer. 

Sure, the motor isn’t as powerful as what you’ll get on top-shelf food processors or blenders, but this one device performs a much wider range of tasks and occupies a smaller overall footprint in your kitchen. The Breville All in One can be a food processor, a masher, an immersion blender or a whisk thanks to a quick-release motor handle that attaches to various tool heads. 

Obviously any tool’s usefulness will depend on the types of food you gravitate towards when cooking, and kitchen appliances that try to do too many things can often end up doing them all poorly, but the All in One strikes an excellent balance between versatility and usefulness that makes it an exceptionally helpful tool in a wide array of circumstances. This makes it an excellent base accessory for any home cook – I think it’s unlikely to sit in the cupboard unused for long periods of time.

This diversity can mean it gets overlooked since there really isn't one specific task you absolutely need it for… but it’s such a versatile tool that it’s helpful for the average cook and it’ll remain useful even if they do invest further in more capable appliances for tasks requiring more powerful and dedicated devices.

There really is value here for most home cooks and its starting price isn't too bad either.

Stick mixer on kitchen bench

(Image credit: Future - Joel Burgess)

Breville the All in One review: Price and availability

  • Available in the US and Australia
  •  List price:  $159.95 / AU$269 

The All in One Stick Mixer is available in both the US and Australia Breville online stores for $159.95 / AU$269, but isn't listed in the UK's Sage online store at the time of writing.  

It might be worth checking out TechRadar’s jug vs immersion blender explainer page to see if you’re more likely to need a dedicated blender than what is on offer here, but for anyone who frequently mashes, grates, slices, chops, whisks and blends food, it’s hard to imagine that this device won’t come in handy for a multitude of applications. 

While you can get basic food processors for less than this price point, they’re unlikely to offer any more power and will usually come with just the one dicing blade. The All in One has grating and slicing capabilities included alongside the standard food processing capabilities that practically justifies the price tag on its own.

You will only have basic blending capabilities, so I wouldn’t really consider this to be a blender replacement, but throw in the mashing and whisking tools and you have a tool with a heap of perks bundled in for an entry-level price.  

Stick mixer on kitchen bench

(Image credit: Future - Joel Burgess)

Breville the All in One: specifications

Breville the All in One review: Design and features

  • Great entry-level food processor
  • Grating and slicing blades included
  • Also beats, blends and mashes

The 6-cup (1.6L) food processor bowl comes with a textured base to ensure chopped food doesn’t stick to the sides when using the S-blade attachment, and the reversible grating/ shredding disk saves you the hassle of having to manually grate vegetables for example. 

The variable slicing blade for the food processor isn’t as refined as what you’ll be able to achieve on a mandolin, but it does have 18 adjustable thickness settings – from 0.5mm to 6mm – so you can cut perfectly uniform slices in seconds. 

In addition to the food processing tools you also get a masher, a whisker and immersion blender heads. Each of these are pretty self-explanatory, and both the masher and whisker simply take some of the leg work out of processes you’d usually do by hand. While it doesn't always occur to the average home cook, but the stick nature of this appliance means it can be useful in several situations, meaning it will likely get used frequently.

There isn’t a jug accessory that comes bundled with the All in One like with some other stick blender kits, but it is an omission that most home cooks will be able to find a workaround solution for. This makes it a little less appealing as a proper blender solution, but when you consider its limitations with crushing ice you really do want something more dedicated if you’re going to be making a lot of smoothies. Blenders are also likely to be the most common device overlap here for products that people will already have, so it seems like a sensible omission.

Stick mixer on kitchen bench

(Image credit: Future - Joel Burgess)

Breville the All in One review: Performance

  • Decent food processing capabilities
  • Excellent mashing and whisking
  • Reasonable immersion blending

During my testing, I used the Breville All in One to dice ingredients for a batch of peanut butter protein balls, a job that killed the motor on a Smeg Hand Blender that I used previously. The Breville device offered less power than its similarly priced Smeg competitor, but it was able to fully process all the raw ingredients as well as mix the dense combination of highly viscose date, peanut butter and maple syrup concoction. 

This task was definitely at the upper limits of what you’d want to use a handheld motor for, but the All in One proved perfectly capable of performing this task on this occasion. For those planning on regularly mixing batches of protein balls you might be better served by one of TechRadar’s best food processor, for a more powerful device. 

Stick mixer on kitchen bench

(Image credit: Future - Joel Burgess)

I also used the grater/shredder to process a few hundred grams of Grana Padano and Parmigiano Reggiano for a cacio e pepe dish, a really simple task that would have been a lot more work using a hand grater. But just about every grating task is made infinitely simpler by the electric blade’s speed and consistency – once you have this tool in the kitchen it’s hard to imagine having to go back to manual grating.

The immersion blender works well enough as a traditional blender. You might want something a little more serious if you’re regularly trying to crush ice, but the All in One is more than capable of blending the vast majority of soups or smoothies.

Where the immersion blender shines is when you need to refine a sauce into a smoother consistency – you can simply plunge it into hot liquids rather than waiting for sauces to cool enough to put in a food processor.

The masher is great for anyone who likes a good potato mash (or anyone that makes their own baby food) and the whisk comes in handy a lot for baking and other egg-based recipes.

Stick mixer on kitchen bench

(Image credit: Future - Joel Burgess)

Should you buy the All in One from Breville?

Buy it if...

Don't buy it if...

Also consider

How I tested: Breville the All in One

  • I used the All in One for a month
  • I used it as my primary food processor
  • I tested all the other features and functionalities

I tested the Breville All in One by using it over a month with general kitchen tasks like grating cheeses and vegetables, and other food processing tasks like dicing nuts and combining date and peanut butter protein balls. I also used the device on multiple occasions to mash potato, plus whisked eggs and other ingredients for baked goods.

The immersion blender capabilities came in handy when I refining a beef brisket sauce in a pot while on the stove and I used the All in One to blend a light banana smoothie without ice in a jug. I benchmarked this against the Smeg '50s-style Hand Blender, which offers a similar array of attachments and features. 

Read more about how we test

First reviewed: October 2023

Breville the All in One stick mixer review: the best foundational kitchen appliance for home cooks
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Breville the All in One: One-Minute Review

Anyone who enjoys a bit of kitchen craft knows just how useful a food processor can be for boosting your culinary skills. However, if you don't get into the kitchen often, it’s the kind of thing that's not necessarily top of mind, something that takes up a lot of space. If that describes you, you're probably better off with a more lightweight solution like the Breville All in One stick mixer. 

Sure, the motor isn’t as powerful as what you’ll get on top-shelf food processors or blenders, but this one device performs a much wider range of tasks and occupies a smaller overall footprint in your kitchen. The Breville All in One can be a food processor, a masher, an immersion blender or a whisk thanks to a quick-release motor handle that attaches to various tool heads. 

Obviously any tool’s usefulness will depend on the types of food you gravitate towards when cooking, and kitchen appliances that try to do too many things can often end up doing them all poorly, but the All in One strikes an excellent balance between versatility and usefulness that makes it an exceptionally helpful tool in a wide array of circumstances. This makes it an excellent base accessory for any home cook – I think it’s unlikely to sit in the cupboard unused for long periods of time.

This diversity can mean it gets overlooked since there really isn't one specific task you absolutely need it for… but it’s such a versatile tool that it’s helpful for the average cook and it’ll remain useful even if they do invest further in more capable appliances for tasks requiring more powerful and dedicated devices.

There really is value here for most home cooks and its starting price isn't too bad either.

Stick mixer on kitchen bench

(Image credit: Future - Joel Burgess)

Breville the All in One review: Price and availability

  • Available in the US and Australia
  •  List price:  $159.95 / AU$269 

The All in One Stick Mixer is available in both the US and Australia Breville online stores for $159.95 / AU$269, but isn't listed in the UK's Sage online store at the time of writing.  

It might be worth checking out TechRadar’s jug vs immersion blender explainer page to see if you’re more likely to need a dedicated blender than what is on offer here, but for anyone who frequently mashes, grates, slices, chops, whisks and blends food, it’s hard to imagine that this device won’t come in handy for a multitude of applications. 

While you can get basic food processors for less than this price point, they’re unlikely to offer any more power and will usually come with just the one dicing blade. The All in One has grating and slicing capabilities included alongside the standard food processing capabilities that practically justifies the price tag on its own.

You will only have basic blending capabilities, so I wouldn’t really consider this to be a blender replacement, but throw in the mashing and whisking tools and you have a tool with a heap of perks bundled in for an entry-level price.  

Stick mixer on kitchen bench

(Image credit: Future - Joel Burgess)

Breville the All in One: specifications

Breville the All in One review: Design and features

  • Great entry-level food processor
  • Grating and slicing blades included
  • Also beats, blends and mashes

The 6-cup (1.6L) food processor bowl comes with a textured base to ensure chopped food doesn’t stick to the sides when using the S-blade attachment, and the reversible grating/ shredding disk saves you the hassle of having to manually grate vegetables for example. 

The variable slicing blade for the food processor isn’t as refined as what you’ll be able to achieve on a mandolin, but it does have 18 adjustable thickness settings – from 0.5mm to 6mm – so you can cut perfectly uniform slices in seconds. 

In addition to the food processing tools you also get a masher, a whisker and immersion blender heads. Each of these are pretty self-explanatory, and both the masher and whisker simply take some of the leg work out of processes you’d usually do by hand. While it doesn't always occur to the average home cook, but the stick nature of this appliance means it can be useful in several situations, meaning it will likely get used frequently.

There isn’t a jug accessory that comes bundled with the All in One like with some other stick blender kits, but it is an omission that most home cooks will be able to find a workaround solution for. This makes it a little less appealing as a proper blender solution, but when you consider its limitations with crushing ice you really do want something more dedicated if you’re going to be making a lot of smoothies. Blenders are also likely to be the most common device overlap here for products that people will already have, so it seems like a sensible omission.

Stick mixer on kitchen bench

(Image credit: Future - Joel Burgess)

Breville the All in One review: Performance

  • Decent food processing capabilities
  • Excellent mashing and whisking
  • Reasonable immersion blending

During my testing, I used the Breville All in One to dice ingredients for a batch of peanut butter protein balls, a job that killed the motor on a Smeg Hand Blender that I used previously. The Breville device offered less power than its similarly priced Smeg competitor, but it was able to fully process all the raw ingredients as well as mix the dense combination of highly viscose date, peanut butter and maple syrup concoction. 

This task was definitely at the upper limits of what you’d want to use a handheld motor for, but the All in One proved perfectly capable of performing this task on this occasion. For those planning on regularly mixing batches of protein balls you might be better served by one of TechRadar’s best food processor, for a more powerful device. 

Stick mixer on kitchen bench

(Image credit: Future - Joel Burgess)

I also used the grater/shredder to process a few hundred grams of Grana Padano and Parmigiano Reggiano for a cacio e pepe dish, a really simple task that would have been a lot more work using a hand grater. But just about every grating task is made infinitely simpler by the electric blade’s speed and consistency – once you have this tool in the kitchen it’s hard to imagine having to go back to manual grating.

The immersion blender works well enough as a traditional blender. You might want something a little more serious if you’re regularly trying to crush ice, but the All in One is more than capable of blending the vast majority of soups or smoothies.

Where the immersion blender shines is when you need to refine a sauce into a smoother consistency – you can simply plunge it into hot liquids rather than waiting for sauces to cool enough to put in a food processor.

The masher is great for anyone who likes a good potato mash (or anyone that makes their own baby food) and the whisk comes in handy a lot for baking and other egg-based recipes.

Stick mixer on kitchen bench

(Image credit: Future - Joel Burgess)

Should you buy the All in One from Breville?

Buy it if...

Don't buy it if...

Also consider

How I tested: Breville the All in One

  • I used the All in One for a month
  • I used it as my primary food processor
  • I tested all the other features and functionalities

I tested the Breville All in One by using it over a month with general kitchen tasks like grating cheeses and vegetables, and other food processing tasks like dicing nuts and combining date and peanut butter protein balls. I also used the device on multiple occasions to mash potato, plus whisked eggs and other ingredients for baked goods.

The immersion blender capabilities came in handy when I refining a beef brisket sauce in a pot while on the stove and I used the All in One to blend a light banana smoothie without ice in a jug. I benchmarked this against the Smeg '50s-style Hand Blender, which offers a similar array of attachments and features. 

Read more about how we test

First reviewed: October 2023