Organizer
Gadget news
Samsung Galaxy S22 review: a small-form wonder
7:17 pm | March 30, 2022

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets | Tags: , , | Comments: Off

Two-minute review

It's hard to write a Samsung Galaxy S22 review without making reference to its big brother, the Galaxy S22 Ultra. Now there's a phone with a radical new idea. Okay, it's an idea borrowed from the Galaxy Note line, but still, the Ultra stands apart from the S22 and S22 Plus. In fact, it makes the Galaxy S22 feel a bit less-than.

Similarly, we need to mention that the Samsung Galaxy S23 series has now been unveiled - including the Samsung Galaxy S23 Plus and Samsung Galaxy S23 Ultra, and the Galaxy S22 feels slightly dated compared to them.

But these are also more expensive phones, so we’d be comparing apples to oranges to an extent. So let’s focus on what makes the Samsung Galaxy S22 such a fun, attractive, and palm-friendly device.

Put simply, the S22 has enough of everything. It pushes no boundaries in terms of photography, screen size, and battery life, yet it still compares favorably to Apple's $799 / £849 / AU$1,339 iPhone 14.  

Samsung's flagship phone provides more megapixels and sensors for photos, and gives you 3x optical zoom. To get something similar on the iPhone, you'll have to jump up to the pricier Pro models.

The Samsung Galaxy S22 is the kind of phone you get if your tastes are upscale but your budget is a bit downrange. Its 6.1-inch screen can feel cramped if you’re coming from virtually any similarly-priced Android phone from OnePlus and Xiaomi. However, placed side-by size with an iPhone 14, the dimensions are similar – and the resemblance is uncanny. 

It's a handset that will quickly become a trusted companion. The cameras should satisfy most average mobile photography users, and the image quality is excellent. The adaptive screen-refresh technology does a nice job of keeping everything from fast scrolls to action games looking smooth, and you’ll have no trouble shooting and editing 4K, 30fps video. The Galaxy S22 can also shoot 8K, but the screen stuttered while shooting it so we’re not ready to say this is an 8K-winner.

Like the rest of the S22 line, the Galaxy S22 is running Qualcomm's Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 in the US, or Samsung’s own Exynos chip in the UK and elsewhere,) and both are backed by 8GB of RAM and up to 256GB of storage. The mobile CPU is snappy and capable, but that storage limit without the ability to add a microSD card is frustrating.

Overall, if you like Samsung and Android together, this is an affordable and familiar (we see you, Galaxy S21) way to get in at the top of the Galaxy line, making it one of the best Samsung phones and even one of the best Android phones. For those who want a 5G Samsung Galaxy but want to pay hundreds less, they should look at the Galaxy A Series, including the attractive Galaxy A53.

If you're looking for the perfect Samsung Galaxy S22 audio partner, you may want to check out our Samsung Galaxy Buds 2 Pro review.

Samsung Galaxy S22 price and availability

Samsung Galaxy S22 specs

Weight: 167g
Dimensions: 146 x 70.6 x 7.6mm
Display size: 6.q-inch
Resolution: 1080 x 2340
Chipset: Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 / Exynos 2200
RAM: 8GB
Storage: 128/256GB
Rear camera: 50MP + 10MP + 12MP
Front camera: 10MP
Pre-installed software: Android 12
Battery: 3,700mAh
Charging: 25W wired, 15W wireless 

The Samsung Galaxy S22 went on sale on February 25, 2022, in the US, March 3, 2022, in Australia, and March 11, 2022, in the UK. 

You can pick up the Galaxy S22 with 128GB storage for $799 / £769 / AU$1,249, or with 256GB for $849 / £819 / AU$1,349. That pricing has not changed since the Galaxy S21 line.

Note however that while those are the standard prices, you can now often find the Galaxy S22 for less than that, and now that the Samsung Galaxy S23 series has arrived the price is likely to keep on dropping.

Samsung Galaxy S22 design

  • Not a huge redesign over its predecessor
  • Comes in a few attractive color designs
  • Has a strong glass rear

Samsung Galaxy S22 back angle

The Gorilla Glass back of the Samsung Galaxy S22 (Image credit: Future / Lance Ulanoff)

Samsung evidently opted not to stray far from the Galaxy S21 design from the previous year, but there are two differences - one is noticeable, the other not so much.

The Galaxy S22 has a 6.1-inch display, making it 0.1 inches smaller than its predecessor, but it’s not something you’ll notice. What is noticeable is the new Gorilla Glass Victus Plus back – the rear was plastic last year. This change gives the phone a much more premium feel, and the Galaxy S22 now feels every bit as solid, and looks as elegant, as the iPhone 13.

This is a phone that’s small enough to slip into your pocket or bag and forget about. In today's world of oversized phones (like the larger Galaxy S22 Ultra), the S22's 70.6 x 146 x 7.6mm, 168g chassis feels puny. Apple's iPhone 13 mini,  which Apple is discontinuing, previously held the ‘small flagship’ crown, though.

Image 1 of 3

Samsung Galaxy S22 bottom edge

(Image credit: Future / Lance Ulanoff)
Image 2 of 3

Samsung Galaxy S22 side edge

(Image credit: Future / Lance Ulanoff)
Image 3 of 3

Samsung Galaxy S22 edge

(Image credit: Future / Lance Ulanoff)

Where Apple now favors a smooth flat metal band around its phones, the Galaxy S22's aluminum frame offers a small, albeit pleasing curve, which some may find slightly more comfortable to hold for long periods than the iPhone 14. The phone is IP68 rated, which makes it water and dust-resistant. In practice, a drop in the sink is no big deal.

We’re glad Samsung left the contour-cut camera module untouched. It's attractive and efficient. The brushed glass back looks and feels great, and does a nice job of highlighting our test unit's Forest Green color – it also doesn’t show fingerprints. Other color options include Phantom Black, Phantom White, Pink Gold, and Bora Purple.

There are just two buttons – power and the volume rocker – along one edge of the phone. On the top edge is a tiny hole for a microphone. The bottom houses one speaker (the other half of the decently-loud stereo speaker system is hidden along the top edge of the display), the SIM slot, another microphone hole, and the USB-C charging port (note that the S22 doesn’t support the 45W charger that Samsung sells for the Galaxy S22 Plus).

Samsung Galaxy S22 display

  • 6.1-inch screen, smaller than on the S21
  • Has a 2340 x 1080 resolution and 120Hz refresh rate
  • Bright and attractive display

The edge-to-edge Dynamic AMOLED display has a resolution of 2340 x 1080 pixels, which is good, though it is lower than the iPhone 14's Super Retina XDR 2532 x 1170 display. Samsung makes up for that deficit by having a smaller black bezel around the screen, and no intrusive notch.

Samsung Galaxy S22 Display

Samsung Galaxy S22's AMOLED screen (Image credit: Future / Lance Ulanoff)

To accommodate the 10MP front-facing camera, Samsung has cut a small circle in the display. It's not distracting, and didn’t break our immersion through long games of PUBG Mobile.

The screen is as bright and attractive as any we’ve seen. The adaptive refresh rate (10Hz to 120Hz) makes every movement in scrolling, videos, and games look smooth. High refresh rates can burn through charge quickly, so you can lock the refresh rate at 60Hz if you want to extend battery life, or at 120Hz if this isn’t a concern for you. 

The screen also promises to boost touch sampling (the speed at which it will recognize and respond to touch) for Game Mode. We had no responsiveness issues, but we also haven't noticed any gaming sluggishness in other flagship phones we've tested this year.

Underneath the display is the ultrasonic fingerprint reader. This lets you register your finger (or fingers) of choice and is an effective biometric security tool. The phone also supports face recognition, though there's also a warning that it's less secure on this device than fingerprint unlocking is.

Samsung Galaxy S22 cameras

  • 50MP main, 12MP ultra-wide, 10MP telephoto camera
  • 10MP selfie camera
  • A range of Samsung camera modes

Samsung Galaxy S22 Camera Array

Samsung Galaxy S22 Camera Array (Image credit: Future / Lance Ulanoff)

While the Samsung Galaxy S22 looks a lot like the S21, right down to the contour-cut camera array, Samsung has mixed things up a bit.  There are still three lenses, but some of the sensors backing them are different.

The 12MP ultrawide f/2.2 camera is virtually unchanged, but it's now grouped with a new 50MP f/1.8 main camera and a 10MP f/2.3 telephoto. That last camera has far fewer pixels than the S21’s 64MP sensor but keeps the zoom at 3x (the S21 listed the zoom as hybrid; this is optical zoom). You can enjoy digital zoom up to 30x, which is fun, but not as good or exciting as the S22 Ultra's 100x Space Zoom. Still, it's nice to get 3x optical on a sub-$800 phone.

On the front is the 10MP selfie camera, which appears unchanged from the Galaxy S21.

Image 1 of 3

Samsung Galaxy S22 Portrait mode 3

(Image credit: Future)

You can adjust the bokeh effect before or after you take a portait mode photo.

Image 2 of 3

Samsung Galaxy S22 portrait mode 1

(Image credit: Future)
Image 3 of 3

Samsung Galaxy S22 portrait mode 2

(Image credit: Future)

Photography across a range of styles (wide, ultrawide, portrait, night mode) and the available lenses are good. Samsung's over-bright colors are still in evidence; they have a tendency to make, for instance, the sky too blue, and the results almost never match what you see with the naked eye. Looking back at the photos, you can't help but be pleased, but if you want absolute color fidelity, you might look elsewhere.

Portrait mode photography, which lets you adjust the bokeh effect before or after you take the shot, is a strong point. The software does an excellent job of separating subjects – human, or otherwise – from their background for professional-looking results.

The 10MP, 3x optical zoom does a good job, though its capabilities break down when it comes to 10x and 30x. We’re not sure there are enough pixels to support this level of digital (even AI-backed) interpolation.

The camera app includes a rather deep set of shooting modes and controls, many of them hidden under ‘More’ (typical of an Android phone). There's Pro mode, for instance, which gives you control over shutter speed, ISO (film speed in old-school camera-speak), focus point, and white balance.

The Samsung Galaxy S22 doesn't include a Cinematic mode, as Apple does in the iPhone 13, but you can adjust the depth of focus while shooting video if you use the Pro Video mode setting. With that on, you can tap on any subject and the camera will refocus on them. It's a shame Samsung hides such a useful feature in this way.

Camera samples

Image 1 of 9

Samsung Galaxy S22 tree photo

(Image credit: Future)
Image 2 of 9

Samsung Galaxy S22 tree photo

(Image credit: Future)
Image 3 of 9

Samsung Galaxy S22 tree photo

(Image credit: Future)
Image 4 of 9

Samsung Galaxy S22 zoom

(Image credit: Future)
Image 5 of 9

Samsung Galaxy S22 wide

(Image credit: Future)
Image 6 of 9

Samsung Galaxy S22 ultrawide

(Image credit: Future)
Image 7 of 9

Samsung Galaxy S22 ultrawide

(Image credit: Future)
Image 8 of 9

Samsung Galaxy S22 ultrawide

(Image credit: Future)
Image 9 of 9

Samsung Galaxy S22 reflection photo

(Image credit: Future)

Samsung Galaxy S22 performance and specs

  • Uses Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 chip in the US and Asia
  • Uses Exynos 2200 everywhere else
  • Powerful, with a fair amount of storage

Samsung has equipped all members of its S22 line with one of its latest mobile chipsets. In the US, that’s the  Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 1, while outside the US and Asia the Galaxy S22 runs on Samsung’s own Exynos 2200. Both processors are paired with 8GB of RAM, and either 128GB or 256GB storage.

When we benchmarked the Galaxy S22 against the S22 Ultra, we found the Geekbench scores to be essentially equal. Both phones’ scores are still generally lower than Apple's A16 Bionic’s, though.

None of this is to say the Galaxy S22 feels slow. It has more than enough power for casual mobile tasks (web browsing, app work) and extra juice for videos, games, 4K video shooting, and editing. The 8K video shoot was a stuttering disaster, but otherwise, we were pleased.

We wish Samsung didn't skimp on storage (256GB max without the option of a microSD upgrade is simply not enough) and leave out WiFi 6E (it has WiFi 6), but these are relatively minor quibbles.

Samsung Galaxy S22 software

  • Android 12 with Samsung's One UI over the top
  • Lots of pre-installed Samsung apps
  • Has 5G connectivity

Samsung Galaxy S22 front hole punch

Samsung Galaxy S22 front hole punch for 10MP selfie camera. (Image credit: Future / Lance Ulanoff)

The entire Samsung Galaxy S22 phone family runs on Samsung's One UI 4.1, laid over Android 12.

We like One UI because it mostly doesn't get in the way of a clean Android 12 experience. Yes, it still has its own web browser, which you can happily ignore (along with Samsung's Calendar and Contacts apps), and Bixby (which is tied to the power button for no good reason), but the Gallery app for photos and videos is passable (Google Photos, which is also present, is better).

This is also a 5G phone, which means you can enjoy blazing-fast mobile connectivity where you can get a decent signal. Indoors, however, that's often impossible. Even in the suburbs of most big cities, 5G coverage is spotty. But we did have fun streaming HD Netflix on the train ride home until we moved out of 5G range and back into LTE.

Samsung Galaxy S22 battery life

  • 3,700mAh battery - 300mAh smaller than before
  • USB-C cable, but no wall plug, included
  • Charges at 25W - also supports wireless

It's not clear why Samsung shrunk the Galaxy S22's battery down by 300mAh, from a capacity of 4,000mAh on the S21 to 3,700mAh here, but it doesn't appear to have much of an impact. We got roughly 12 hours of battery life with varied and almost constant use. Your mileage may vary.

The phone doesn’t ship with a charging adapter – just the USB-C cable – but you can use any compatible 25W adapter or charge wirelessly via a Qi adapter. 

Should I buy the Samsung Galaxy S22?

Samsung Galaxy S22 on box

(Image credit: Future / Lance Ulanoff)

Buy it if...

Don't buy it if...

Also consider

If this Samsung Galaxy S22 review has you wondering what else is out there, here are some other similar mobiles that might also tempt you.

iPhone 14

The iPhone 14 is a capable smartphone with a seriously snappy CPU, lovely screen, and good cameras. It pales in comparison to the iPhone 14 Pro, but then you’re also saving $200 / £250 / AU$350. If you’re not looking for a big screen on a budget (for that, see the new iPhone 14 Plus), this solid, if unspectacular iPhone – with a couple of really cool next-gen features that you may never use – might be for you.

Read our iPhone 14 review

OnePlus 10T review
The OnePlus 10T is a worthy mid-range Android phone. Its good-looking screen, powerful chipset and fast charging make it a tempting buy for certain users. It’s not perfect – corners have clearly been cut in the camera, battery life and design departments to keep the price lower than it needs to be – but some users will find the lower price and different features make this a solid buy over the premium 10 Pro.

Read our OnePlus 10T review

  • First reviewed March 2022
Wise Program Uninstaller review
7:10 am | March 29, 2022

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets Pro Software & Services | Comments: Off

Too many apps on your computer? Frustrated by pre-installed software? Windows’ standard uninstall tool is good, but at times it is not good enough. The solution is a third-party utility designed to uninstall software and ensure that all related data is extracted from your computer.

Various uninstaller tools are available. Wise Program Uninstaller is published by WiseCleaner, founded in 2005 by a trio of programmers to produce free or affordable system utilities for Windows.

If you’re looking for an uninstaller, Wise Program Uninstaller may be a name that comes up in your search. To explore whether this is a good option, we’ve taken an in-depth look at the software, comparing pricing, features, usage, how it compares to the competition, and other factors

Wise Program Uninstaller: Plans and pricing

Various apps and tools are available from WiseCleaner, some of which are paid. Others, like Wise Program Uninstaller, are free. This is confirmed on the download page: “Wise Program Uninstaller is a completely free removal tool.”

This is clearly a major advantage; paying for software that you will typically only use once or twice can be tough to justify.

There is no path from free trial to paid software, no annual subscription, and no limit on the number of PCs that Wise Program Uninstaller can be installed on. You simply download it for free and use the software. Better still, Wise Program Uninstaller is not ad-supported, either.

Wise Program Uninstaller: Features

Wise Program Uninstaller review

(Image credit: Wise Program Uninstaller)

Wise Program Uninstaller has a very clear and open user interface, which blends in with the current design and feel of Windows. This makes it easy to use and intuitive. It includes some key features to assist with program removal.

Remove desktop apps

All types of desktop applications, games, and utilities can be removed with Wise Program Uninstaller. Software is grouped by type – desktop, Metro/Windows Store apps, and system components – with details on size and installation date for each. Uninstalling is a simple matter of checking the boxes (batch uninstall is supported) and clicking the Uninstall button. This prompts the official uninstall procedures for the selected apps and follows it with a user-prompted clean-up of the registry and orphaned files.

Note that the Store app removal feature includes those apps that come pre-installed on Windows 11.

Restore point creation

Making changes to Windows can result in problems later on if they’re not correctly planned. Wise Program Uninstaller can create a restore point if required, ready to be wound back if the uninstall doesn’t go as planned.

Custom uninstall tool

Software that won’t uninstall and leaves considerable residual data behind can be deleted with the Custom Uninstall button. A file browsing tool is provided to find the folder with the left-behind data and delete everything related to it.

Custom Uninstall

(Image credit: WiseCleaner)

Clean-up browser extensions

In addition to desktop software removal, this utility will also handle browser extensions. We tested it on Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft Edge, and it removed unwanted extensions in seconds.

Regular updates

Wise Program Uninstaller receives updates, with an update-checking button in the menu. Remember: this is free software, so it’s particularly impressive that it is maintained in this way.

System requirements

Wise Program Uninstaller is for recent Windows versions, particularly Windows 11. If your PC runs Windows 11, then it will have no problem with this software. 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows are supported.

It can also be installed on older systems, but the installer doesn’t work on Windows XP. For this, you will need to use the portable version of Wise Program Uninstaller, which can be created within the app.

On older PCs, the software needs a Pentium 1GHz CPU or higher, 4GB of RAM, and at least 40MB of disk space.

Wise Program Uninstaller: Interface and in-use

Wise Program Uninstaller is easy to download, install, and use. It’s free, so it takes just one click to download the setup file from the official website. After that, run the setup file, and installation takes barely a minute. You’re now prepared to use the app. 

Wise Program Uninstaller review

(Image credit: Wise Program Uninstaller)

The user interface is a list of all installed programs on your PC and the ability to select them individually or in batches and uninstall them. There are no confusing menus or features hidden deep within specific menus. The software has just one core function: uninstall apps, so this interface is simple to understand and navigate. 

Wise Program Uninstaller: Support

On the WiseCleaner website, you will find a comprehensive support portal, built around FAQs for each of its products. Wise Program Uninstaller has three FAQs, as well as a digital user manual. Other support tools relevant to this software include the ability to contact the WiseCleaner team for help via an online form.

In addition, if you want to find out what other users think of the software and any issues and related solutions they’ve uncovered, you can check the WiseCleaner Community Forum. This has dedicated boards for its paid software, and separate boards for the free tools like Wise Program Uninstaller.

Support can also be accessed from within the software by clicking the Support Center menu option. This opens an interface for reporting problems or suggestions.

WiseCleaner has built an excellent reputation for customer support and has garnered a Trustpilot score of 4.4.

Wise Program Uninstaller review

(Image credit: Wise Program Uninstaller)

Wise Program Uninstaller: The competition

If you’re looking at uninstaller tools then you already know that there are several tools in this portion of the PC optimizer market. Wise Program Uninstaller already has an advantage over many of them thanks to being free.

The paid competition includes Iobit Uninstaller and Ashampoo Uninstaller, and both are good, affordable alternatives. But Wise Program Uninstaller has strong competition from Geek Uninstaller and Bulk Crap Uninstaller, both Windows software uninstaller tools that can be used completely free.

While Geek Uninstaller can be exchanged for the PRO version and extra features and elevated support, Wise Program Uninstaller doesn’t offer that option. Your decision will depend on whether you want support from a tool like this, or if removing some annoying apps is all you need.

Wise Program Uninstaller: Final verdict

We really liked the presentation of Wise Program Uninstaller, especially compared to some of the alternatives. It feels modern and sits alongside native Windows software without looking like a relic from the past.

It is also easy to use, with everything you need to remove applications and games from your computer. Unlike some alternatives (like Bulk Crap Uninstaller) the Wise Program Uninstaller doesn’t give you the ability to drill down into specific data; similarly, it is focused purely on uninstalling unwanted software.

The product support and customer information for the utility is impressive. In fact, it compares favorably against various paid and subscription product uninstaller solutions. 

As for the price, it’s pretty unbeatable, and we think this is one of the best Windows software uninstaller utilities around.

We've also highlighted the best free software uninstallers

Rode NTH-100 review
2:00 am |

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets | Comments: Off

One-minute review

[Update February 1, 2023: As of February 2023, a mic attachment has been released for the NTH-100 headphones. Alternatively, you can also purchase both the NTH-100 and the NTH-Mic in a bundle under the name NTH-100M.]

For decades Rode has been known around the globe for its quality microphones, and now with the release of its first ever pair of headphones, the Aussie company has taken its pursuit of quality to another category.

The Rode NTH-100 is the brand's first ever pair of headphones and are available now for $149 / £149 / AU$249. They're aimed at audio professionals with their studio grade performance, but comfortably appeal to anyone seeking a top-quality listening experience.

They’re cabled, closed-back headphones that don’t feature any of the modern conveniences associated with Bluetooth headphones, but their focus on sound, comfort and build quality easily makes up for this.

The NTH-100 sports a classy and professional appearance, with a build quality to match. All the elements, from the headband to the earcup swivels, give a strong degree of confidence in their longevity and day-to-day durability.

Luxurious features like Alcantara coating on the earcups and headband, as well as cooling gel coupled with memory foam in the cups, make for a comfortable experience, even for longer periods. Despite their large size, these features help to make the headphones practically vanish when worn.

Onto the star of the show: the audio quality is exceptional, living up to Rode’s high standards. Despite being closed-back by design, the 40mm drivers give a similar sense of space and clarity usually reserved for much pricier open-back headphones.

The audio profile is rather neutral, ideal for monitoring and close listening, but the NTH-100 listening experience manages to be more fun than other monitoring headphones we’ve heard. With that said, you won’t necessarily get the same compression and excitement as you would with the Beats Solo 3 or Sony WH-1000XM4, but you also won’t get the listening fatigue and low-end skew that typically comes with it.

For their price, the Rode NTH-100 are an exceptional pair of headphones that focus on the audio, and don’t forego comfort or durability in the process. For everyday commuters and casual listeners, some Bluetooth alternatives might present a better option, but for professionals or those after a deeper listening experience, these cans excel.

Studio Monitoring Headphones: Rode NTH-100

(Image credit: Rode)

Rode NTH-100 price and release date

  • Available now
  • $149 / £149 / AU$249

The Rode NTH-100 headphones launched March 29, 2022 for $149 / £149 / AU$249 globally and are available in a single color – black (although four different colors of headband, earcups and cables will be sold separately).

As a point of comparison, Sony’s MDR-1AM2 (entry-level audiophile headphones) launched at twice this price ($299 / £229 / AU$399), and while their lightweight design and exceptional clarity are impressive, the Rode NTH-100 offers audio with a better sense of space, and is enclosed in a significantly more robust design – all for half the price.

Another popular pair of cans worth comparing to are the Audio-Technica ATH-M50x, which have been available for almost five years. As such, they're typically available lower than their retail price at around the same as the NTH-100 ($149 / £149 / AU$249), but the Rode cans blow them out of the water for overall clarity and space in the audio, as well as comfort.

As of February 2023, you can pick up the the NTH-100 bundled with a microphone under the name NTH-100M. This headset is priced at $189 / AU$329 (UK pricing yet to be revealed). Alternatively, if you already own a pair of the NTH-100 headphones, the NTH-Mic has also been released. It's a standalone boom mic attachment and will only set you back $69 / AU$99 (UK pricing currently unavailable). At this time, we have not reviewed the NTH-Mic or NTH-100M.

Design

  • Extra measures for comfort
  • Classy and professional look
  • Premium materials for the price

The NTH-100 are cabled over-ear headphones, and from the outset you’ll notice they lack features found on many wireless counterparts. There’s no microphone, transport or volume controls, voice assistant, noise-cancellation or (obviously) any form of wireless connectivity. This, however, is by design.

These Rode headphones are aimed at studio use and focused listening, which means they’re not trying to fill the role of everyday cans for your commute or walk (although they still manage this rather well, despite their intention otherwise). Taking this into consideration, the NTH-100’s design is phenomenal.

Aesthetically, the headphones definitely look like professional kit – they’re not as sleek and minimal as some of the Bluetooth cans out there with their visible cabling and somewhat techy appearance, but their pure black palette is more suave than most gaming headsets and other such gaudy designs. With that said, there’s an option to swap out the earcups, headband and cable for four different colors (all of which are sold separately) if you’d prefer some personalization.

Studio monitoring headphones: Rode NTH-100

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Rode’s iconic “Ø” is emblazoned prominently on the exterior of each of the rather large earcups, as is the brand’s small golden circle motif, so there’s no mistaking who made the headphones. Overall, we’d say the design maintains class without trying to hide its professional intention.

The NTH-100 boasts solid construction, with sturdy materials like the stainless spring steel headband and solid plastic of the smaller components all giving the impression of robust design. Even the swivels for the earcups – a common weak point in headphones – feel more durable than is typical. It’s all rather reassuring for the longevity of the product.

Rode claims that the headband has been rated for the equivalent of 25 years of use, the wiring that links the earcups can withstand 25kg of force, and the cable and earcup sockets can each withstand 12kg. The bayonet mounting of the detachable cable is also designed to deliberately give way before that of the headphone connector, meaning that in an especially hairy situation, you’ll only be replacing the cable rather than the cans themselves.

In the box is a cloth pouch to further help protect the headphones, a ¼-inch adapter and a nice long (2.4m) cable, with the option to buy shorter (1.2m) cables separately. The long cable is mostly a blessing, but also a minor curse. For its intended purpose, it means you can stand and move around while still stationed by your computer or monitoring device, but if you only need it to travel a short distance, the extra length can add some weight to your head (albeit minor) and some extra microphonics, or cable noise, when it brushes against something.

Studio Monitoring Headphones: Rode NTH-100

As can be seen by the padding, the earcups are more triangular in shape than most headphones. (Image credit: TechRadar)

The earcups swivel both left-to-right and up-and-down, but only so much as to provide a comfortable position with them flush against your head. Their shape is somewhat triangular rather than the classical circular or ovaloid shapes found in most headphone designs. 

We found this shape to suit our ears perfectly, encapsulating them comfortably, leading us to wonder why it isn’t an industry standard. One extra convenience on the earcup front – each one features an audio connection, meaning you can have your cable running to the left or right cup as desired.

Another feature we’d love to see appearing on more headphones is a mechanism Rode is calling, FitLok. This amounts to two simple mechanisms that lock the adjustable headband in place once you’ve found the appropriate size. It’s incredibly simple to use, fluidly variable, and saves you from the hassle of readjustment every time they get nudged or jostled when handling or carrying them in a bag.

Studio monitoring headphones: Rode NTH-100

The FitLok system is incredibly useful and simple to employ. (Image credit: TechRadar)

Both the earcups and headband are coated in Alcantara – an incredibly soft, plush and breathable material that’s typically reserved for designer products and supercar interiors. The headphones are exceedingly comfortable to wear and, despite their large size, practically disappear when worn. There’s no feeling of constriction, even with this reviewer’s massive head, and the two-way swivelling earcups ensure all the appropriate contact points of the cans are in their right places. 

Furthermore, the earcups are crafted from a combination of memory foam and CoolTech gel, which (along with the Alcantara cladding) helps to reduce heat build-up during longer listening sessions and still manages to create a decent seal for audio isolation.

Although we did mention that these studio headphones aren’t trying to compete with everyday wireless cans, we would have loved to see the inclusion of a microphone in the NTH-100, especially considering Rode’s immense talents in this department. This would make them ever-so-slightly more suited to being permanently plugged in as a combination personal/professional pair of headphones at your primary workstation.

Considering the fact that the headphones feature TRRS connections and that the cabling is detachable and sold separately at different lengths, it’s conceivable that Rode may release a cable that features an in-line microphone down the road, but for now, assume this capability isn’t present.

Audio performance

  • Incredible sense of space
  • Open-back sound in closed-back cans
  • Excellent clarity and neutral response

With the focus squarely on audio performance for the Rode NTH-100, we were very pleased that our expectations were met, and even surpassed. While aimed towards professional use, these cans sound so good we’d recommend them to anyone wanting a detailed listening experience.

Despite sporting a closed-back design, these headphones offer many of the advantages of open-back cans without their inherent drawbacks (namely high pricing and sound leakage). The sense of space offered by the NTH-100 is among the best we’ve encountered, offering up excellent separation and reducing the fatigue that can come with listening to ‘close’ sounding audio for extended periods.

This means you’ll be hearing different elements and instruments distinctly, even in dense mixes. The overall clarity is superb, with no perceivable distortion at high volumes – the presence and weight of a track is still conveyed admirably with plenty of headroom to spare, and there’s no sign of the compression inherent to many headphones that offer more ‘excited’ audio signatures.

Studio Monitoring Headphones: Rode NTH-100

(Image credit: Rode)

Skrillex’s track Supersonic (My Existence), featuring Noisia, Josh Pan and Dylan Brady, offers up its explosive suckerpunch of a drop with rich detail and clarity while retaining its immense impact. The haunting lead vocals in the verse drift over the tension-building, warped samples and swelling sub bass, while the crisp fizz of the bass takes centre stage at the drop, without dominating and squashing out the other surrounding elements. 

The same is true for the Yung Gud remix of Foreign Fields by Kacy Hill, with its soaring and reverb-drenched twin climaxes retaining their punch despite all the extra room they’re given to breathe. Fringe elements, like the bird calls, ocean sounds and hi-hats are given clear space in the overall mix, appearing distinct over more dominant elements but not detracting from impression.

For something a little lighter, the beautiful ballad Me (Heavy) by Fred Again Is revealed in all of its textural and artifact-laden beauty when listening on the Rode NTH-100. The heavily filtered and stuttering drum loop doesn’t compete for space with the wonky, unhinged lead line, nor the gorgeous lead vocals when they land, despite how deliberately lo-fi the production is. The intimacy of Fred’s vocal line is made all the more present, with the track’s lush harmonies, pads and piano lines supporting his breathy delivery without getting in its way.

As you may be able to tell from these examples, the spatial clarity, headroom and separation produced by the NTH-100 is exceptional, so much so that it breathes new life into tracks we’ve been listening to on heavy rotation for years.

As for the frequency response, we found it to be incredibly neutral (as is to be expected from professional studio monitors), with less sub-bass and low-frequency dominance than you’d find in many sets of Bluetooth headphones. 

While this can come across as ‘unexciting’ if you’re used to the likes of Sony and Beats cans, we found Rode’s delivery to be considerably more enjoyable for casual music listening than many other monitor headphones we’ve sampled (such as from Sennheiser and Audio-Technica). The NTH-100 somehow manages to inject some fun into the clinical role of reference audio, and we suspect its sense of space has a lot to do with this.

Should I buy the Rode NTH-100?

Studio Monitoring Headphones: Rode NTH-100

(Image credit: Rode)

Buy them if...

Don't buy them if...

Rode NTH-100 review
2:00 am |

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets | Comments: Off

One-minute review

[Update February 1, 2023: As of February 2023, a mic attachment has been released for the NTH-100 headphones. Alternatively, you can also purchase both the NTH-100 and the NTH-Mic in a bundle under the name NTH-100M.]

For decades Rode has been known around the globe for its quality microphones, and now with the release of its first ever pair of headphones, the Aussie company has taken its pursuit of quality to another category.

The Rode NTH-100 is the brand's first ever pair of headphones and are available now for $149 / £149 / AU$249. They're aimed at audio professionals with their studio grade performance, but comfortably appeal to anyone seeking a top-quality listening experience.

They’re cabled, closed-back headphones that don’t feature any of the modern conveniences associated with Bluetooth headphones, but their focus on sound, comfort and build quality easily makes up for this.

The NTH-100 sports a classy and professional appearance, with a build quality to match. All the elements, from the headband to the earcup swivels, give a strong degree of confidence in their longevity and day-to-day durability.

Luxurious features like Alcantara coating on the earcups and headband, as well as cooling gel coupled with memory foam in the cups, make for a comfortable experience, even for longer periods. Despite their large size, these features help to make the headphones practically vanish when worn.

Onto the star of the show: the audio quality is exceptional, living up to Rode’s high standards. Despite being closed-back by design, the 40mm drivers give a similar sense of space and clarity usually reserved for much pricier open-back headphones.

The audio profile is rather neutral, ideal for monitoring and close listening, but the NTH-100 listening experience manages to be more fun than other monitoring headphones we’ve heard. With that said, you won’t necessarily get the same compression and excitement as you would with the Beats Solo 3 or Sony WH-1000XM4, but you also won’t get the listening fatigue and low-end skew that typically comes with it.

For their price, the Rode NTH-100 are an exceptional pair of headphones that focus on the audio, and don’t forego comfort or durability in the process. For everyday commuters and casual listeners, some Bluetooth alternatives might present a better option, but for professionals or those after a deeper listening experience, these cans excel.

Studio Monitoring Headphones: Rode NTH-100

(Image credit: Rode)

Rode NTH-100 price and release date

  • Available now
  • $149 / £149 / AU$249

The Rode NTH-100 headphones launched March 29, 2022 for $149 / £149 / AU$249 globally and are available in a single color – black (although four different colors of headband, earcups and cables will be sold separately).

As a point of comparison, Sony’s MDR-1AM2 (entry-level audiophile headphones) launched at twice this price ($299 / £229 / AU$399), and while their lightweight design and exceptional clarity are impressive, the Rode NTH-100 offers audio with a better sense of space, and is enclosed in a significantly more robust design – all for half the price.

Another popular pair of cans worth comparing to are the Audio-Technica ATH-M50x, which have been available for almost five years. As such, they're typically available lower than their retail price at around the same as the NTH-100 ($149 / £149 / AU$249), but the Rode cans blow them out of the water for overall clarity and space in the audio, as well as comfort.

As of February 2023, you can pick up the the NTH-100 bundled with a microphone under the name NTH-100M. This headset is priced at $189 / AU$329 (UK pricing yet to be revealed). Alternatively, if you already own a pair of the NTH-100 headphones, the NTH-Mic has also been released. It's a standalone boom mic attachment and will only set you back $69 / AU$99 (UK pricing currently unavailable). At this time, we have not reviewed the NTH-Mic or NTH-100M.

Design

  • Extra measures for comfort
  • Classy and professional look
  • Premium materials for the price

The NTH-100 are cabled over-ear headphones, and from the outset you’ll notice they lack features found on many wireless counterparts. There’s no microphone, transport or volume controls, voice assistant, noise-cancellation or (obviously) any form of wireless connectivity. This, however, is by design.

These Rode headphones are aimed at studio use and focused listening, which means they’re not trying to fill the role of everyday cans for your commute or walk (although they still manage this rather well, despite their intention otherwise). Taking this into consideration, the NTH-100’s design is phenomenal.

Aesthetically, the headphones definitely look like professional kit – they’re not as sleek and minimal as some of the Bluetooth cans out there with their visible cabling and somewhat techy appearance, but their pure black palette is more suave than most gaming headsets and other such gaudy designs. With that said, there’s an option to swap out the earcups, headband and cable for four different colors (all of which are sold separately) if you’d prefer some personalization.

Studio monitoring headphones: Rode NTH-100

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Rode’s iconic “Ø” is emblazoned prominently on the exterior of each of the rather large earcups, as is the brand’s small golden circle motif, so there’s no mistaking who made the headphones. Overall, we’d say the design maintains class without trying to hide its professional intention.

The NTH-100 boasts solid construction, with sturdy materials like the stainless spring steel headband and solid plastic of the smaller components all giving the impression of robust design. Even the swivels for the earcups – a common weak point in headphones – feel more durable than is typical. It’s all rather reassuring for the longevity of the product.

Rode claims that the headband has been rated for the equivalent of 25 years of use, the wiring that links the earcups can withstand 25kg of force, and the cable and earcup sockets can each withstand 12kg. The bayonet mounting of the detachable cable is also designed to deliberately give way before that of the headphone connector, meaning that in an especially hairy situation, you’ll only be replacing the cable rather than the cans themselves.

In the box is a cloth pouch to further help protect the headphones, a ¼-inch adapter and a nice long (2.4m) cable, with the option to buy shorter (1.2m) cables separately. The long cable is mostly a blessing, but also a minor curse. For its intended purpose, it means you can stand and move around while still stationed by your computer or monitoring device, but if you only need it to travel a short distance, the extra length can add some weight to your head (albeit minor) and some extra microphonics, or cable noise, when it brushes against something.

Studio Monitoring Headphones: Rode NTH-100

As can be seen by the padding, the earcups are more triangular in shape than most headphones. (Image credit: TechRadar)

The earcups swivel both left-to-right and up-and-down, but only so much as to provide a comfortable position with them flush against your head. Their shape is somewhat triangular rather than the classical circular or ovaloid shapes found in most headphone designs. 

We found this shape to suit our ears perfectly, encapsulating them comfortably, leading us to wonder why it isn’t an industry standard. One extra convenience on the earcup front – each one features an audio connection, meaning you can have your cable running to the left or right cup as desired.

Another feature we’d love to see appearing on more headphones is a mechanism Rode is calling, FitLok. This amounts to two simple mechanisms that lock the adjustable headband in place once you’ve found the appropriate size. It’s incredibly simple to use, fluidly variable, and saves you from the hassle of readjustment every time they get nudged or jostled when handling or carrying them in a bag.

Studio monitoring headphones: Rode NTH-100

The FitLok system is incredibly useful and simple to employ. (Image credit: TechRadar)

Both the earcups and headband are coated in Alcantara – an incredibly soft, plush and breathable material that’s typically reserved for designer products and supercar interiors. The headphones are exceedingly comfortable to wear and, despite their large size, practically disappear when worn. There’s no feeling of constriction, even with this reviewer’s massive head, and the two-way swivelling earcups ensure all the appropriate contact points of the cans are in their right places. 

Furthermore, the earcups are crafted from a combination of memory foam and CoolTech gel, which (along with the Alcantara cladding) helps to reduce heat build-up during longer listening sessions and still manages to create a decent seal for audio isolation.

Although we did mention that these studio headphones aren’t trying to compete with everyday wireless cans, we would have loved to see the inclusion of a microphone in the NTH-100, especially considering Rode’s immense talents in this department. This would make them ever-so-slightly more suited to being permanently plugged in as a combination personal/professional pair of headphones at your primary workstation.

Considering the fact that the headphones feature TRRS connections and that the cabling is detachable and sold separately at different lengths, it’s conceivable that Rode may release a cable that features an in-line microphone down the road, but for now, assume this capability isn’t present.

Audio performance

  • Incredible sense of space
  • Open-back sound in closed-back cans
  • Excellent clarity and neutral response

With the focus squarely on audio performance for the Rode NTH-100, we were very pleased that our expectations were met, and even surpassed. While aimed towards professional use, these cans sound so good we’d recommend them to anyone wanting a detailed listening experience.

Despite sporting a closed-back design, these headphones offer many of the advantages of open-back cans without their inherent drawbacks (namely high pricing and sound leakage). The sense of space offered by the NTH-100 is among the best we’ve encountered, offering up excellent separation and reducing the fatigue that can come with listening to ‘close’ sounding audio for extended periods.

This means you’ll be hearing different elements and instruments distinctly, even in dense mixes. The overall clarity is superb, with no perceivable distortion at high volumes – the presence and weight of a track is still conveyed admirably with plenty of headroom to spare, and there’s no sign of the compression inherent to many headphones that offer more ‘excited’ audio signatures.

Studio Monitoring Headphones: Rode NTH-100

(Image credit: Rode)

Skrillex’s track Supersonic (My Existence), featuring Noisia, Josh Pan and Dylan Brady, offers up its explosive suckerpunch of a drop with rich detail and clarity while retaining its immense impact. The haunting lead vocals in the verse drift over the tension-building, warped samples and swelling sub bass, while the crisp fizz of the bass takes centre stage at the drop, without dominating and squashing out the other surrounding elements. 

The same is true for the Yung Gud remix of Foreign Fields by Kacy Hill, with its soaring and reverb-drenched twin climaxes retaining their punch despite all the extra room they’re given to breathe. Fringe elements, like the bird calls, ocean sounds and hi-hats are given clear space in the overall mix, appearing distinct over more dominant elements but not detracting from impression.

For something a little lighter, the beautiful ballad Me (Heavy) by Fred Again Is revealed in all of its textural and artifact-laden beauty when listening on the Rode NTH-100. The heavily filtered and stuttering drum loop doesn’t compete for space with the wonky, unhinged lead line, nor the gorgeous lead vocals when they land, despite how deliberately lo-fi the production is. The intimacy of Fred’s vocal line is made all the more present, with the track’s lush harmonies, pads and piano lines supporting his breathy delivery without getting in its way.

As you may be able to tell from these examples, the spatial clarity, headroom and separation produced by the NTH-100 is exceptional, so much so that it breathes new life into tracks we’ve been listening to on heavy rotation for years.

As for the frequency response, we found it to be incredibly neutral (as is to be expected from professional studio monitors), with less sub-bass and low-frequency dominance than you’d find in many sets of Bluetooth headphones. 

While this can come across as ‘unexciting’ if you’re used to the likes of Sony and Beats cans, we found Rode’s delivery to be considerably more enjoyable for casual music listening than many other monitor headphones we’ve sampled (such as from Sennheiser and Audio-Technica). The NTH-100 somehow manages to inject some fun into the clinical role of reference audio, and we suspect its sense of space has a lot to do with this.

Should I buy the Rode NTH-100?

Studio Monitoring Headphones: Rode NTH-100

(Image credit: Rode)

Buy them if...

Don't buy them if...

KitchenAid 13 cup / 3.1L Food Processor review
12:30 pm | March 28, 2022

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets Home Small Appliances | Tags: , , | Comments: Off

KitchenAid KFP1318 / KFP1319: two-minute review

Product info

This model has slightly different names and product codes in different territories:

US: KitchenAid 13 Cup Food Processor KFP1318 / KFP1319
UK: KitchenAid 1.7 L Food Processor 5KFP1318 / 5KFP1319
AU: KitchenAid 13 Cup Food Processor KFP1319

The products with 319 in their codes have an extra dicing accessory and storage lid. For this review, we tested both of the UK models. There may be minor differences between different countries' models.

When it comes to countertop kitchen appliances, KitchenAid is a firm and trusted favorite, so it should come as no surprise that the KitchenAid 13 Cup / 3.1L food processor has left an impression on us.

This KitchenAid 13 Cup / 3.1L food processor is available in two different configurations – the standard 13 Cup / 3.1L food processor (KFP1318), and an identical version but with an extra dicing accessory and storage lid (KFP1319). In the US and the UK,  you can buy both versions, whilst only the dicer iteration is available in Australia. The current price of the KFP1318 is $169.99 / £237.15, and the KFP1319 is $239.99 / £239 / AU$369.

With both models, you’ll get an adjustable slicing disc, a reversible shredding disc, a multipurpose stainless steel chopping blade, and a dough blade. These all slot into a plastic storage caddy that fits inside the main bowl, providing a neat and easy storage solution. The size of this food processor is in line with similar models, it’s not exactly compact but it doesn’t take up a ton of space either.

A close up of the 13 cup work bowl of the KitchenAid 13 cup food processor, the black handle is on the right hand side. It is photographed against a pink background.

(Image credit: Future)

Removing and replacing the work bowl is delightfully easy, the one-click system means you can simply push it down to fix the bowl in place, which is more convenient than the conventional twist closures. Unlike most food processors, the main lid is hinged, but is also removable. In the case of the KFP1319, this can be replaced with the included refrigerator lid, to store food without tipping it into a separate container.

The 13 cup / 3.1L food processor offers two speeds and a pulse button, and the lid contains three removable pushers for inserting different-sized foods. As an added bonus, everything is top-rack dishwasher safe so cleaning is a doddle. The parts are easy to hand wash, too. However, it proved tricky to remove the dried pastry mixture from the little indents and crevices in the fitment ring of the chopping blade. We found that ingredients with smaller particles, like the almond dust, and ingredients from the pastry mixture liked to migrate inside the fitment ring of the chopping blade. This didn’t cause any issues, but we had to pay particular attention to this area when we hand-washed the chopping blade between tests.

A close up of the button controls on the front of a white KitchenAid 13 cup food processor.

(Image credit: Future)

On test, it coped well with most foods, slicing, shredding, and dicing with ease. The sharp stainless-steel blade and the dough blade work well, but there are limitations to the quantity of foods like dough and beef that can be processed, despite it being one of KitchenAid’s largest food processors. With this in mind, perhaps it’s best suited to smaller households or people who don’t want to process big batches of food if these are ingredients that are used often.

Overall, we were happy with the performance of the KitchenAid 13 Cup / 3.1L food processor. It breezed its way through most of what we threw in it, is not as loud as some other food processors we’ve tested, and has a well-considered and convenient design. It gets a thumbs-up from us.

KitchenAid KFP1318 / KFP1319 review: price & availability

  • KFP1318 list price: $169.99 / £237.15
  • KFP1319 list price: $239.99 / £239 / AU$369
  • Model available varies by region

The KitchenAid 13 cup / 3.1L Food Processor models available will vary depending on your location.  Both models are available to purchase directly from KitchenAid in the US, and they can both be purchased in the UK too, but only KFP1318 can be bought from KitchenAid directly. Only KFP1319 is available in Australia. There are no optional accessories available to buy separately.

A white KitchenAid Classic 13 cup / 3.1l sitting on a stone effect surface and against a pink background, with the storage caddy containing a reversible slicing disc on the right side, and the reversible grating  on the left.disc

(Image credit: Future)

The current price of the KFP1318 is $169.99 / £237.15, and the KFP1319 is $239.99 / £239 / AU$369. Some of the KitchenAid products are on sale currently, and it's worth keeping an eye out for KitchenAid promo codes to help take the price down.

Small appliances like this often attract discounts during major shopping events like the Amazon Prime Day deals and Black Friday sales, so if you aren't looking to invest this much in a processor right now, it's worth coming back during those events to see what deals are available.

  • Value for money score: 3.5 out of 5

KitchenAid KFP1318 / KFP1319 specifications

KitchenAid KFP1318 / KFP1319 review: design & features

  • Two speeds and pulse
  • Easy to assemble
  • All attachments can be stored inside main bowl

The KitchenAid 13 cup / 3.1L Food Processor itself is no bigger or smaller than other similar capacity models, measuring 8.75 x 8.75 x 18 inch  / 222 x 222 x 464mm. What makes it feel smaller and more compact is the clever storage solution that we mentioned earlier. All of the accessories slot into the caddy which goes inside the main bowl, except in the case of the KFP1319 as the refrigerator lid will need to be stored separately.

The main hinged lid has three different size removable food pushers, ideal for lots of different foods. The lid removes easily from the bowl and can be replaced with the refrigerator lid to allow you to store food without decanting it into a different container if you have the KFP1319.

Image shows the black plastic storage caddy from the KitchenAid 13 cup food processor. It has the adjustable slicing disc on the top, and the reversible grating disc on the grey stone-effect surface on the right. It is photographed against a pink background.

(Image credit: Future)

As we’ve already noted, the accessories include a stainless steel blade and dough blade. The slicing disc is adjusted via a knob on the lid, making it very safe and simple to adjust, and there are six thickness options to choose from. The reversible shredding disc offers thick as well as thin shredding. And the dicing accessory cleverly cubes all manner of foods to about 0.4 inches / 1cm dice. Setup is simple and apart from the dicing accessory, we rarely had to consult the manual to work out how to put it together. All removable parts are dishwasher-safe on the top rack.

The round base looks nice on the counter and it’s not too imposing. The KFP1318 is available in White, Contour Silver, Empire Red, Black and Matte Black in the US, but is only available in White in the UK. For the KFP1319 the same range of colors are available in the US. The same colors are available in Australia too, but instead of the White option there is Almond Cream.

 A few design features are immediately noticeable, including a hinged lid that clips shut with a latch. Additionally, the bowl sits directly onto the base thanks to the one-click system, no awkward twisting motion to get it into position like you’ll see on many other food processors. Our only complaint is that the handle can only be positioned to the right, making it less comfortable for left-handed cooks, and less accessible for some, as they may be unable to use it due to this limitation.

  • Design score: 4 out of 5

KitchenAid KFP1318 / KFP1319 review: performance

  • Not too loud
  • Excellent chopping, slicing and dicing
  • Can only process smaller batches of meat and dough

We used the large side of the shredding disc for carrot and cheese and it sped through both, producing even shreds fast. A small disc of carrot was left un-shredded and a piece of cheese which amounted to about 13% of the total, but otherwise we were happy with the results. 

The slicing disc is really easy to use and we like that the adjustment knob is on the lid, making it super easy to adjust the size of the slices. It sliced through half a cucumber in seconds, producing pleasingly even slices.

A close up photo of neatly sliced cucumber inside the KitchenAid 13 cup food processor work bowl.

(Image credit: Future / Cesci Angell)

To try out the dough blade, we made a bread dough, but the instruction manual advises against processing quantities of dough larger than 13.5 oz / 384g, which isn’t even enough for a standard size loaf. We adjusted our recipe down to the right quantity but the dough blade was quite slow to combine the ingredients into a dough and required an extra splash of water to help it come together. The food processor wobbled a little when mixing the dough, but it wasn’t unstable.

The stainless-steel blade aced almost every task we gave it, finely and evenly chopping onion and breadcrumbs as well as mixing a smooth cake batter. Hazelnuts were very finely chopped but with a little powder. Almonds on the other hand were chopped unevenly, with large and small pieces and a fair amount of powder.

A close up photo of some onion that was chopped by the Kitchen Aid 13 cup processor.

(Image credit: Future / Cesci Angell)

Cubed beef was no match for this blade, it took just seconds to turn it into finely ground meat. But the instruction manual advises that only 0.5lb / 225g can be chopped in one go, which is half as much as we intended to chop and quite a small quantity given the food processor's overall capacity.

Finally, we tried out the dicing accessory and we were impressed with how fast it diced two potatoes. We had to chop the potatoes in half to fit in the feed chute, but the results were excellent nonetheless and it really does make short work of this labor-intensive task.

The KitchenAid KFP1319 food processor having just been used to grate cheese

(Image credit: TechRadar)

It was loudest when shredding with our noise meter maxing out at 84dB, which is the equivalent to the noise experienced when a truck is traveling at 40mph, but during the other tasks, it averaged around 75dB, which is similar to sound level when a toilet is flushed.  

  • Performance score: 4 out of 5

Should I buy the KitchenAid KFP1318 / KFP1319?

Buy it if...

Don't buy it if...

KitchenAid KFP1318 / KFP1319 review: also consider

How we tested the KitchenAid KFP1318 / KFP1319

We spent time assembling the KitchenAid 13 cup / 3.1L Food Processor, reading the instruction manual and assessing the design and accessories.

To put the food processor through its paces we used the chopping blade and different speed settings to chop carrot, cucumber, onion, and almonds. We also used it to process bread to make breadcrumbs and combine flour, margarine, and water to make pastry.

We tested how easy it was to clean the processor parts by hand-washing, and using the dishwasher to establish how well the parts cleaned with either method.

Read more about how we test

  • First reviewed March 2022, re-tested June 2024
OnlyOffice review
10:49 pm | March 26, 2022

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets Pro Software & Services | Comments: Off

OnlyOffice was created by Ascensio System SIA, a software enterprise headquartered in Latvia. It was initially introduced in 2009 under the moniker TeamLab, before being rebranded to OnlyOffice in 2014. Concurrently, Ascensio also released an open-source variant of OnlyOffice in the same year.

OnlyOffice may be accessed either as a cloud-based tool or deployed on-premise servers. The cloud-based option is charged on a per-user basis, while the on-premise option is charged on a per-server basis.

This review of OnlyOffice aims to assist in determining whether it represents a suitable productivity software suite for your organization. Our evaluation is founded upon specific criteria, encompassing features, pricing, customer support, ease of use, and other relevant considerations. 

OnlyOffice: Plans and pricing

OnlyOffice offers distinct pricing structures tailored to the specific deployment options it provides. In the context of cloud computing, OnlyOffice adopts a subscription-based pricing model, allowing users to access its services on a recurring basis. Conversely, for on-premise deployments, the pricing is determined based on the number of servers procured. 

Cloud Pricing

(Image credit: OnlyOffice)

Cloud Pricing

This version introduces three tiers: Startup, Business, and Enterprise. The Startup tier, while free of charge, offers limited functionality, with only 2 GB of file storage. The Business tier, starting at $20 per month, includes additional features and increases storage capacity to 250 GB. The Enterprise on-site deployment requires direct contact with the organization to determine the cost per server for lifetime installation, which is $6550.

There is also a Docs Enterprise tier, which starts at $8 per user per month for the cloud version, or an on premise install starting at $1500 for the 1 year license that supports 50 users. 

On-Premise Pricing

(Image credit: OnlyOffice)

On-prem

The on-premise version has three tiers; Enterprise, Enterprise Plus, and Enterprise Premium. Unlike the cloud-based version, you pay for a lifetime license rather than a subscription. 

Enterprise costs $1900 per server, Enterprise Plus costs $3000 per server, and Enterprise Premium costs $4150 per server. Each plan is capped at 50 users per server. If your enterprise surpasses that number, you can pay the same amount for another 50-user license.  

OnlyOffice: Features

OnlyOffice, a comprehensive productivity suite, offers various applications, one of which is OnlyOffice Docs. Similar to Microsoft Office, it combines the functionality of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint into a single package.

OnlyOffice Docs consists of four primary components:

1. Document Editor: Allows users to create, view, and edit text documents.

2. Spreadsheet Editor: Provides spreadsheet functionality for creating and managing data.

3. Presentation Editor: Facilitates the creation and delivery of presentations.

4. Form Creator: Enables the creation of customizable forms for data collection

Document Editor

(Image credit: OnlyOffice)

Document Editor

Introducing the Document Editor – a robust word processing tool that empowers you to create, format, and edit text documents with ease. It supports a wide range of file formats including DOC, DOCX, ODT, TXT, PDF, and HTML, ensuring compatibility with various systems and platforms.

The Document Editor is packed with features that you would expect from professional word processing software. You can control fonts and styles, format text, adjust paragraph and line spacing, customize page layout, insert headers and footers, and more. Additionally, you can enrich your documents with images, tables, charts, shapes, and more. All the added objects can be effortlessly repositioned, resized, or aligned to suit your preferences.

For detailed analysis, the Document Editor offers insights into word count, paragraphs, and characters, and provides a version history feature that allows you to restore previous versions of your document.

The Document Editor integrates seamlessly with various third-party add-ons to extend its functionality. These add-ons allow you to insert YouTube videos, translate words and sentences, and edit images directly within the editor, saving you the hassle of switching between multiple applications.

Lastly, collaboration is made easy with real-time document editing. Team members can collaborate simultaneously, leaving comments or engaging in discussions through the built-in chat tool within the editor, ensuring seamless coordination and efficient teamwork.

Presentation Editor

(Image credit: OnlyOffice)

Presentation Editor 

With OnlyDocs' Presentation Editor, you can create eye-catching presentations much like you would with Microsoft PowerPoint. You can create and save your presentations in various formats, including PDF, PNG, JPG, PPTX, PPT, and ODP.

There are numerous ways to design an appealing presentation with OnlyDocs. For instance, you can add customizable charts, tables, and equations to present statistics effectively. You can also enhance your presentations with videos, clip art elements, and special symbols using third-party add-ons.

OnlyDocs features a convenient "Presenter View" mode. In this mode, you can add notes to emphasize crucial parts of your presentation. You can also smoothly navigate to any slide with a single click. Additionally, you can collaborate with your colleagues on presentations in real time.

Form Creator

(Image credit: OnlyOffice)

Form Creator

With the Form Creator, users can generate detailed forms and extract information after they've been completed. Users can create a form from scratch or use a provided template and host it online for designated respondents to fill out. The forms can include text areas, drop-down lists, checkboxes, and combo boxes.

OnlyOffice offers an email management tool for enterprises, allowing them to create corporate emails for team members by adding a mail server to their domain name. Custom corporate emails give organizations a more professional image compared to generic ones, highlighting the importance of this feature.

OnlyOffice Mail provides standard features expected in an email platform, such as sorting email into folders, automatic mail sorting with filters, attachment capabilities, signature creation and management, and more. It's a formidable competitor to popular corporate email management tools like Google Workspace and Zoho Mail

CRM

(Image credit: OnlyOffice)

OnlyOffice CRM

Essential for every business, OnlyOffice CRM is a comprehensive customer relationship management (CRM) system that facilitates the monitoring and management of all communications and interactions with customers. OnlyOffice CRM enables you to establish a comprehensive customer database and closely track interactions with each individual. Additionally, you can craft forms to gather sales data or generate and transmit invoices directly from within the application. 

With OnlyOffice CRM's seamless integration with Twilio, a widely-used cloud communications platform, users gain the ability to directly answer customer calls from within the CRM interface, enhancing communication management and customer service capabilities.

OnlyOffice Projects

OnlyOffice Projects serves as a comprehensive  project management software solution. It enables users to establish tasks and subtasks, assign responsibilities to specific individuals, and subsequently monitor the progress of such tasks. Additionally, it incorporates time-tracking capabilities to evaluate performance and generate reports in an automated manner. This all contributes to making OnlyOffice Projects an ideal tool to monitor small or medium-sized projects within an organization. 

OnlyOffice Calendar

With OnlyOffice Calendar, you can establish and label calendars for effective organization within your team. It allows you to add upcoming events to calendar dates, ensuring all team members are informed and updated. Additionally, you can create personalized timetables and calendars and selectively share them with specific individuals. Finally, there are also integrations with other OnlyOffice tools like Mail and Projects. 

OnlyOffice: Interface and use

Subscribing to and using OnlyOffice turned out to be quite straightforward. The first step involves creating an account on their official website. Upon doing so, you will be provided with a subdomain under the “onlyoffice.eu” URL extension. This subdomain effectively becomes your dedicated online office workspace. 

When opting for the on-premise version, the OnlyOffice workspace is hosted on your servers, complete with a dedicated IP address, instead of being located on an OnlyOffice domain.

Interface

All of the various tools in OnlyOffice can be accessed from a menu on the left (Image credit: OnlyOffice)

Interface

The web interface of this software is pleasingly neat and uncluttered. Additionally, OnlyOffice offers mobile apps for iOS and Android, making it a great choice for those who frequently work on the go.

Support

There are also useful guides and tutorials in OnlyOffice's Help Center (Image credit: OnlyOffice)

OnlyOffice: Support

Enterprise users of OnlyOffice enjoy customer support through both email and telephone, whereas home users are limited to using only the forum for support. The platform offers a single email address for support, but telephone support lines vary based on the user's country of residence. 

OnlyOffice: The competition

Among OnlyOffice's primary competitors are Microsoft 365 and Google Workspace, and Zoho. While OnlyOffice offers comparable features to Zoho, Microsoft Office 365 and Google Workspace boast greater versatility and a wider range of tools.

A key advantage of OnlyOffice compared to its competitors, such as Zoho, Google Workspace, or Microsoft Office 365, is the ability to deploy the software on in-house servers. This provides users with maximum control over security, ensuring that their data remains secure and within their organization's control.

OnlyOffice: Final verdict

OnlyOffice presents itself as a compelling office productivity software suite. It serves as a comprehensive platform designed to facilitate effective communication and collaboration within an organizational setting. Nonetheless, our evaluation revealed certain limitations, notably its relatively high cost and the initial challenges associated with its implementation. 

We've featured the best document editing and management software.

signNow review
11:30 am |

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets | Comments: Off

With all this hybrid working across a global workplace, companies to fast shifting to secure digital document solutions. We’ve seen a massive rise in the best cloud storage and PDF editors to keep files accessible but safe. 

When it comes to signing documents without printing them, the best eSign software is ideal, letting you create digital signatures, work together, and share and track files. And signNow from airSlate is tailored-made for the task. 

signNow: Pricing & plans

airSlate's signNow esignature service

You can monitor the progress of your documents from your dashboard and send reminders to colleagues  (Image credit: airSlate)
  • A eSign service for businesses with subscription tiers adding additional features and security tools - but a 7-day free trial is available 

As signNow is an online service, it’s unsurprisingly subscription-based.  You’re presented with 4 different tiers, with a yearly commitment saving you up to 60% compared to paying monthly. There's also a 7-day free trial to see if it works like you need it to. 

The Business plan is cheapest. With it, you’re able to send a document to be signed to other parties. You’ll find tools to fill in forms, you’re allowed to create as many templates as you need, connect to other online storage services such as OneDrive, Google Drive, and Box. There’s access to a mobile app, so you can keep track of your documents on the go. This will cost you $20 a month or $96 a year.

Business Premium adds a few extra features for $30 a month or $180 a year. This includes reminders, sending documents in bulk, and adding your custom logo design (it’s easy to make one using the best logo maker). You can find a ‘kiosk mode’ for the mobile app, letting you grab someone’s signature in person, which is useful. 

In addition to this, Enterprise subscribers gain the ability to request payment when a person signs a document. You’ll also benefit from better security, being able to attach additional documents when signing, and introduce fillable fields to your templates. This plan is priced at $50 a month or $360 a year.

Finally the Business Cloud subscription introduces multiple users to the same account, CRM/ERP integration, HIPAA and 21CFR Part 11 compliance. The price is based on the number of users, with a minimum of 5 per account, starting at $50 per month per user or $600 per year per user. 

  • Pricing & plans: 4/5

signNow: Setting digital signatures

airSlate's signNow esignature service

airSlate simplifies the creation of electronic signatures (Image credit: airSlate)
  • Creating an e-signature is an easy process that’s as hands-on as you need it to be

The sign-up process is actually as simple as it can be. All you need to start is your email address and password. A click on an email they send you to verify your address is genuine, and you’re good to go.

Once in, you type in your name and signNow will offer you a generic signature and initials, based on a cursive font. If you’re fine with that, click on Next. You can change it later if you wish, or right now by clicking on Change Signature or Change Initials.

Doing this gives you multiple options, which are the same for either your signature or initials. You’re able to rewrite your name, change the font that’s used (there are 8 on offer), draw your signature using your mouse or trackpad, which is always fun. Alternatively, you can upload an image of your signature.

During the setting process, you’ll be encouraged to add the email address of some of your colleagues, to make it easier further down the road to share your documents with them. As with your signature, if you don’t want or need to do that right now, you can skip this process and return to it at any time later on. You’re now ready to start working with PDF documents.

  • Setting digital signatures: 4.5/5

signNow: Preparing documents

airSlate's signNow esignature service

Import a PDF, manually create fields to be filled in, and even set who can complete which section of the form  (Image credit: airSlate)
  • Add various types of editable fields to a file quickly and easily

When working with documents, the first thing you need to do is tell signNow who it will need to be sent to. You’ll also find a list of recent recipients to make it easier to send work to people you collaborate with often. If you have to fill it in yourself, just click on the Add Myself button.

‘Save and Continue’ gets you to the working interface proper, which is similar in layout to others we’ve seen before. To the left is a sidebar with all the tools available to you, from your signature, to text boxes, radio buttons, drop-down menus, formulas and more. You can add any of these to your document, a large preview of which takes up most of the interface, to that sidebar’s right. The right sidebar offers a thumbnail preview of all the document’s pages.

signNow is designed to set up which recipient is allowed to fill in specific elements, and this is clear from the very start: just above the tools in the left sidebar is a list of people who will be allowed to edit the document you’re currently working on. You can even modify that list right from that section.

Each one of your colleagues sports a different color, with each one applied to the elements added to a document. We felt this made it very simple to see at a glance who is allowed to modify different sections of a document.

To add an element, click on it, then move the cursor over to your document (no need to drag). You’ll see your cursor has that element attached to it. Position your cursor over the correct location and click to add the element.

Don’t worry if its position is not exactly right, you can now drag it and also resize it, until you’re happy with it. You’re also able to change which recipient gets to alter that element thanks to a pulldown menu above it.

Click again on your document to add the same element elsewhere. This makes it easy to quickly populate your file with editable text fields for instance, without having to go back to the sidebar each time. You’ll find that setting up a document with all relevant fields can be done very efficiently with this method.

  • Preparing documents: 4/5

signNow: Completing documents

airSlate's signNow esignature service

Filling the form offers no real formatting tools - just add the information and you’re done  (Image credit: airSlate)
  • Fill in just the sections you need, but the lack of formatting options is disappointing

Once your document is prepared, signNow brings you to the Send Invite section, which is where you set up how you’re going to notify the people who need to fill in the document. One recent feature is the ability to contact people via SMS as opposed to email. You get to customise your message for each, and when ready, click on ‘Send Invite’.

It’s a little odd to have to send an invite to yourself in order to begin filling in the fields you’ve added, and signing a document, but that’s how signNow works - treating you the same as all the other members of the team.

Once you’re in that stage, click on each field to enter the appropriate information. As you do, they will turn green, helping you see at a glance what you still need to do. You have no apparent ability to alter the font or perform any other formatting. This limits your options but also makes it easy to input the necessary data quickly.

Click on Finish, top right, when you’re done. Although if you’ve missed a field somewhere, signNow will inform you of that and even allow you to see where they’re located (most useful when working with multi-page docs. Selecting Close saves your work so you can get back to it later, and ‘Decline’, is pretty self-explanatory.

signNow’s main dashboard lets you see at a glance which documents have been done, which are incomplete, who hasn’t yet signed it, etc. You even have a way to resend invites to specific colleagues to nudge them gently. This is also where you can archive documents, print, download and delete them.

  • Completing documents: 3.5/5

signNow: Scorecard

Should I buy...?

airSlate's signNow esignature service

signNow will send the file via email or SMS to the relevant recipients with an optional customized message  (Image credit: airSlate)

Buy it if...

You need to frequently work with others, and have to manage and monitor a list of colleagues who regularly fill in and sign documents.  

Don't buy it if...

 You’re less involved in working with and managing others, compared to filling in your own documents or you prefer using software over working online.

Nectar Mattress review 2023
7:08 pm | March 25, 2022

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets | Tags: , , | Comments: Off

Nectar Mattress review in brief

  • Good price for a mid-range bed-in-a-box 
  • Relatively firm for an all-foam model
  • Gel memory foam delivers good pressure relief

Note: Nectar sells in both the UK and the US. This guide focuses on the Nectar Memory Foam mattress in the US – for the UK review, toggle the flag drop-down menu in the main navigation bar. 

The Nectar Mattress stands out among the more affordable options in the bed-in-a-box market, and thanks to its good support and reasonable prices (starting at $449) it occupies a prime spot in our best mattress guide. This medium-firm mattress – also known as the Nectar Memory Foam Mattress – is suitable for most body types and sleep styles, and it's an especially strong, affordable choice if you're in search of the best mattress for side sleepers. That said there are a few exceptions that we'll spell out in more detail later in this review.

With responsive top layers that contour to your shape and stable foam base giving it a sturdy foundation for better sleep, this is very much a mattress that you sink into (which may or may not appeal to you), and in our tests we found that it delivered a good balance of supportive pressure relief and contouring comfort.

The Nectar Memory Foam shown at an angle so you can see the white cover and Nectar logo on the deep blue base

(Image credit: Nectar Sleep)

You'll find the Nectar Mattress at the top of our best memory foam mattress ranking, and having subjected it to three weeks of rigorous testing we've concluded that it should suit most people who appreciate a medium-firm mattress with a little 'hug'. However, people with heavy bodies may find that they sink in just a bit too much (especially if two are sharing), while lighter-bodied people who like softer beds may well find the Nectar too firm.

For our review we tested a Nectar Memory Foam mattress in queen size, and we loved how the mattress felt firm yet cushioned, cradling pressure points (hips, knees and shoulders), while also feeling stable and supportive.

If you share a bed with a restless sleeper you'll be delighted to learn that we found the Nectar's motion transfer between co-sleepers to be good and low. We also found that it had good edge support, which isn't always the case with all-foam mattresses; they don't usually have as strong an edge support system as hybrid models.

Nectar Mattress specs

Best for: Most sleepers of light to average build; combination and side sleepers
Type: Memory Foam
Trial: 365 nights
Guarantee: Lifetime
Firmness: 6.5 (out of 10)
Materials: Gel memory foam, CertiPUR-US foam, poly-blend
Depth: 12"
Sizes: Twin, twin XL, full, queen, king, split king, Cal king

While it isn't specifically a cooling mattress, the Nectar Mattress features cooling gel foam and a heat-wicking cover that can help keep temperatures down at night. However if you tend to sleep hot or suffer from night sweats, we'd instead direct you to the Nectar Premier Copper Mattress, available from $1,499 at Nectar Sleep, or instead take a look at our best cooling mattress guide for further recommendations.

There are five layers to the Nectar and a mix of premium materials such as contouring gel memory foam, soft and responsive transition foam, a supportive higher-density foam base, and a cool-touch top cover with temperature-regulating properties. You'll get all of that for a lower price compared to most competitor models too. A queen size Nectar Mattress, for example, costs $899 and you'll get up to $499 of free bedding with it. 

On the brand's website, the Nectar Memory Foam has over 46,600 user reviewers, generating an average rating of 4.8 out of 5 stars. Nectar also offers a 365-night risk-free trial, which isn't quite as rare as it used to be (the likes of Saatva, Avocado and DreamCloud also give you a full year), but it is surprisingly generous for a mattress in this price bracket. The big benefit is that you can try the mattress out in all seasons. You'll also get a Forever Warranty and free shipping and returns. Still undecided? Here's our full Nectar Mattress review...

See the Nectar Mattress at Nectar Sleep
The Nectar is ranked second in our mattress guide. It's pretty much never sold at MSRP: there's an evergreen Nectar mattress sale that knocks $200 off all sizes and throws in a free bedding bundle. The value of this varies – best option gets you up to $499 off accessories, depending on the size of bed. However, you'll also find rare flash sales that knock 25% or possibly 33% off the price. That makes the mattress itself cheaper, but you will sacrifice the bedding bundle. You’ll have 365 nights to trial it, and it comes with a Lifetime Warranty.View Deal

Nectar Mattress review: materials

  • Gel-infused memory foam
  • Quilted, cooling polyblend cover
  • Made with toxin-free, Certi-PUR-US materials

The Nectar Memory Foam is made in the US using materials sourced from Malaysia, Vietnam, Mexico and America, and as mentioned earlier in our review, the Nectar is constructed across five individual layers. At the top you’ll find a quilted, cooling polyblend cover with heat-wicking properties, and there’s a nice, soft feel to the cover too.

Beneath the surface sits three inches of high-density, pressure-relieving gel memory foam. This delivers a comforting, body-hug feel that nicely cradles the shoulders, hips and knees during side sleeping, and minimizes pressure points during longer periods of back and stomach sleeping too.

Image shows inside the Nectar Mattress so that you can see each of the five different layers

(Image credit: Nectar)

Next up is two inches of dynamic adjusting foam, which provides a little sink to this Nectar Memory Foam. Finally, a seven-inch layer of sturdy foam makes up the mattress base and delivers support and stability throughout. The Nectar also features a shift-resistant lower cover to ensure it stays put as you sleep.

If you're looking to make your sleep set up as healthy as possible, the Nectar Mattress is a good choice because its made with CertiPUR-US standard foam. This gold-standard certification guarantees that any foams use to make the Nectar contain no harmful toxins.

Nectar Mattress review: prices and deals

  • Ignore MSRP – this mattress is always discounted 
  • It comes with up to $499 of free bedding
  • A lifetime warranty increases your value for money

Price-wise, the Nectar Memory Foam sits squarely within the affordable mattress sector. That means you will find cheaper memory foam models, such as from Zinus, Linenspa, Brooklyn Bedding and Cocoon by Sealy, but also plenty of comparable models that charge a lot more for the same levels of build quality, comfort and support. In other words, the Nectar Mattress is good value for money. 

As is the case with most bed brands, there are regular Nectar mattress sales to take advantage of. Nectar is pretty consistent with what it offers – you can basically ignore MSRP, it's pretty much always sold at the 'normal' prices in the list below, and you'll always get a bundle of bedding for free, too. Here is the official pricing for the Nectar Mattress:

  • MSRP Twin: $873 (normally priced $399)
  • MSRP Twin XL: $1,043 (normally priced $569)
  • MSRP Full: $1,298 (normally priced $699)
  • MSRP Queen: $1,398 (normally priced $799)
  • MSRP King: $1,698 (normally priced $1,099)
  • MSRP Cal king: $1,698 (normally priced $1,099)
  • MSRP Split king: $2,086 (normally priced $1,138)

Nectar also runs occasional flash sales, which typically knock 25% off the price of mattresses. Generally there's no bundle included in these offers though, so if you need the bedding you might be better off paying slightly more for the mattress in the evergreen deal, but getting those extras. 

What about big mattress sales events such as the Black Friday mattress deals or Cyber Monday mattress deals, Labor Day, Memorial Day and the upcoming Presidents' Day mattress sales? Nectar is hit and miss with these kinds of events. In the past, it has just stuck to its evergreen offer and changed the branding, which is pretty underwhelming. There is often a Flash Sale in early November, though.

For Black Friday 2022, though, Nectar has knocked 33% off the range for the month of November, which is great way to snap up a much cheaper price on the mattress itself – although again, no bedding bundle, so you'll need to work out what's best value for you.

Competitors such as Purple also launch regular savings to lower the prices of its various memory foam and hybrids. The Purple Original is the closest rival to the Nectar and its normally on sale for $1,249 in a queen size at Purple, saving you $150. For a cheaper yet equally top-rated alternative to the Nectar, we'd recommend the Cocoon by Sealy Chill Memory Foam, priced just $799 for a queen plus you get up to $178 of free bedding too. That's excellent value for money and something not even Nectar can beat right now.

It's also worth remembering the generous extras you're getting with the Nectar Mattress: the 365-night trial and Forever Warranty. While a year's trial isn't as rare as it once was, it's still pretty unusual for a mattress at this price point. 

Nectar Mattress review: firmness and comfort

  • Plenty of pressure-relieving support
  • Might have too much sink-in for heavy, side or back sleepers
  • Might not keep very hot sleepers cool enough

The Nectar Mattress has just one firmness option of medium firm, plus one height of 12 inches. We support the firmness rating of 6.5 that Nectar gives its Memory Foam mattress, and all members of our testing panel enjoyed this level of firmness too. It's also quite rare to find a true medium-firm memory foam model, but Nectar has achieved this.

The Nectar Mattress photographed in our reviewer's bedroom during the testing process

This is the queen size Nectar Mattress we used for testing (Image credit: Future)

The quilted cooling cover feels soft and plush to the touch, but the layers of gel foam and dynamic foam creates a supportive yet still cozy surface that cocoons the sleeper and relieves pressure points. During our review period, the Nectar Mattress was comfortable when sleeping on our backs and sides. However, anyone who is heavier than 230lbs in weight or who sleeps particularly hot may not find it as comfortable as we did.

Firmness is very subjective too, and one person’s firm may be another person’s medium-firm, which is something to bear in mind, especially when it comes to reading customer user reviews of the Nectar Memory Foam. Compared to similar models we have tested, this mattress’s medium firmness feels just right, and stomach sleepers should also enjoy the combination of plushness plus support.

If you are unsure whether a medium-firm feel would suit your body and sleep needs, and you have a bigger budget, then we would recommend taking a look at our Saatva Classic mattress review too. This luxury innerspring hybrid and foam bed comes in three different firmness levels, including Plush Soft for side sleepers.

Nectar Mattress review: Performance

  • Cooling quilted cover
  • Adequate motion transfer
  • Medium edge support

Our main reviewers for the Nectar Mattress are both side and back sleepers, but we also had stomach and combi sleepers on our wider testing panel. One of our reviewers sleeps warm to hot, so testing the Nectar’s cooling and comfort was key. Over a period of several weeks testing, we looked at all aspects of comfort, support and performance, generating ratings for each of these features and design aspects.

We tested a queen size Nectar Memory Foam by sleeping on it for several weeks, and by inviting various members of our testing panel to try it too. Here's what we discovered during our review process... 

Setup

The Nectar Mattress shown on a plain black bed frame during our review and testing period

(Image credit: Future)

Score: 4.8/5

The Nectar Memory Foam is shipped in a sturdy cardboard box, which allows you to easily remove the wrapped mattress. Nectar supplies a small plastic cutting tool to help open the vacuum-sealed, tough plastic. 

The mattress is fairly heavy (the queen weighs 66lbs), so it might need an extra pair of hands to be unboxed and place on your bedframe for you to unroll. Once free of the plastic, the mattress soon springs to full form and within 30 minutes to an hour it's ready to sleep on, although Nectar advises leaving it for up to 72 hours to inflate fully.

Off-Gassing

Score: 4.8/5

New foam mattresses are often prone to off-gassing as a chemical or plastic smell is released when you unpack it – this is down to VOCs (volatile organic compounds) being let out. However, there was no noticeable off-gassing with the Nectar Memory Foam, despite it being a gel foam model. 

As we unboxed the Nectar, we were unaware of any unpleasant or chemical odors. However, we made sure we still opened the windows to let plenty of air circulate around the room. We should also add that the bedroom where the unboxing took place was fairly large, so you may have a different experience of off-gassing when unboxing the Nectar in a smaller room.

Pressure relief

Illustration shows a blue person lying on the Nectar Mattress and how it reduces pressure on all major impact points such as the hips and shoulders

(Image credit: Nectar Sleep)

Score: 4.5/5

There's ample pressure relief with the Nectar Mattress, but it does depend on your sleeping position and your body type, as we'll now explain... 

Even though it's made with foam, which typically has a different feel to innerspring or hybrids, the Nectar Memory Foam surprised us (in a good way) with its firmer feel. It's unusual to find an all-foam bed that is a true medium-firm, but of course this has its pros and cons for different types of sleepers and body weights. 

Lighter side sleepers may find it too firm around the hips and shoulders, while heavier back and stomach sleepers may still sink in too much (and fall out of alignment) despite the firmer feel. 

The quilted cover on our review sample felt soft and plush, yet underneath there was a sturdy, solid mattress, which only gave slightly under our pressure points. Saying that, we felt well supported and comfortable, which was great for us, but not ideal if you don’t like the feeling of being cradled during. Some may think this sink-in is too great, while others may enjoy the cocooned feeling.

Our overnight guests had no complaints about the performance of the Nectar Mattress either, although one said they did sink in a little bit more than they would have liked, which made rolling over when changing sleep position a bit of an effort.

Motion transfer

Nectar Mattress photographed during our review testing, with a wine glass on one side and a black weight on the other to test motion isolation

(Image credit: Future)

Score: 4.5/5

Motion transfer is about whether you feel your co-sleeper (or pet) shifting around on the other side of the bed. Really well-designed foam mattresses will have good motion-transfer ratings as the foam will be solidly held in a surrounding core for stability. Flimsy foam models, however, tend to have more motion transfer because they aren’t as solid, thick, or deep.

Our reviewers gave the Nectar Mattress 4.5 out of 5 for motion transfer, which is on par with more expensive memory foam options. During testing, we dropped a 10lb weight from a height of eight inches and then four onto the mattress and near an empty wine glass. The aim? To assess how much movement occurred.

During the four-inch test the wine glass barely moved, which indicates the motion on the other side of the bed when someone tosses or turns. For the eight-inch drop, which simulates a person getting in or out of the bed, the wine glass shifted only slightly, meaning you may only feel slight movement when your co-sleeper gets up in the morning or comes to bed later.

Temperature regulation

Our lead review places her hand on the Nectar Mattress to see if it remains cool to the touch after a period of sleeping on it

(Image credit: Future)

Score: 4.3/5

Two members of our testing panel are warm sleepers and, during their weeks sleeping on the Nectar Mattress, they had no complaints about overheating. The Nectar Memory Foam isn't noticeably cooler than room temperature, but the cooling quilted polyblend cover does a good job of keeping the mattress at a neutral to slightly cool temperature.

If you’re a very hot sleeper, you may not find this mattress as cooling as some other options that are specifically designed for the job, such as Nectar's own Premier Copper mattress; see our article – Should I buy the Nectar Premier Copper Mattress? – for more details. But for most people, the Nectar Memory Foam will keep your temperature comfortable. In the interests of review fairness, we used cotton bed sheets that are breathable during sleep.

As for cooling, our hot sleeper found the bed cool enough considering the all-foam construction – something that can accumulate heat. Many mattresses have air channels and other innovative ways of dispersing heat, but the Nectar Memory Foam simply provides a quilted heat-wicking fabric cover and cooling gel foam. Our hot sleeper didn’t notice the Nectar feeling warm, and experienced no instances of waking in the night due to discomfort or overheating.

Edge support

A heavy black weight placed near the edge of the Nectar Mattress during testing of the edge support system

(Image credit: Future)

Score: 4/5

How the edge of the bed acts under compression is a good indicator of a quality mattress, and weaker, sloping edges are a common problem among memory foam models. However, the Nectar Mattress has good edge support for an all-foam model, and we never felt as though we would tumble off if we slept too close to the edge. 

Likewise, sitting on the edge of the Nectar was comfortable, with only a little give. During testing, we placed a 50lb weight near the edge of the mattress and noted how it only sank in about 2.5 inches or so, which was impressive. You can certainly sit on the edge of this one without discomfort or risk of slipping off.

Durability

Score: 4/5

We rated the Nectar Memory Foam high for durability even though we only slept on it for several weeks. We placed it in a guest bedroom and went through several members of our testing panel, including one person who slept on it constantly for a week while recovering from illness. Despite feeling sick, they were comfortable and reported that the Nectar felt comfortable and supportive night after night.

While it’s far too early to show any signs of wear or tear, Nectar Sleep makes this a non-issue anyway by offering a Forever Warranty. This means that if you ever notice sagging, fraying, or other problems with the construction of your mattress, you can contact Nectar to discuss your options for repair or replacement. 

We would still recommend reading the terms and conditions of the warranty though so that you know exactly what will and won't be covered by Nectar.

Nectar Mattress: customer reviews

There are more than 46,600 customer reviews on the Nectar website, with an average star rating of 4.8 out of 5 stars. The vast majority of reviews for the Nectar mattress are extremely positive, with customers saying it delivered great value for money, that the sink-in feel helped them sleep better, and even relieved their back or hip pain (here's what to look for in a mattress if you have back pain). One praises the prompt delivery and notes that it's a great mattress for the price, and concludes that it meets all expectations for a good night’s sleep.

While many people love the feeling of sinking into the Nectar Memory Foam, it's worth flagging that if you're used to innersprings, the feeling of memory foam can take a little getting used to. Amongst the negative comments, most focus around the mattress either feeling too soft or too firm. While some mattress brands offer different firmness choices, you only have one option here – we've addressed this in our 'Firmness and comfort' section to help you get a good idea on what to expect, but the mattress trial is there to take advantage of if it turns out you don't get on with the sleep feel. 

Another comment that crops up a few times is that the Nectar is not supportive enough for heavier people (over 230lb). Some reviewers also noticed an off-gassing smell, which lasted for several hours to several days, and a few found that it slept a bit warm.

If you struggle to get comfortable on a new bed, consider investing in one of the best mattress toppers to boost its softness until you break in your new bed more. 

Should you buy the Nectar Mattress?

A man sleeps next to a woman who is reading a magazine while sat upright on the Nectar Mattress

(Image credit: Nectar)

The Nectar Memory Foam is an affordable, durable and reliable bed-in-a-box that we would recommend to most sleepers and budgets. If you like to feel supported by a medium-firm mattress while also feeling cushioned, then you will enjoy Nectar’s plush top layer and stable support.

Based on our extensive testing, we'd describe the Nectar Mattress as durable, with adequate edge support, limited motion transfer and a neutral temperature that works well for most sleepers. However, if you’re heavy (or very light) in body weight, you sleep very hot, or you prefer sleeping on your stomach, then this might not be the right fit for you. There is a slight cradling feeling here, which you'll either love or find a little too restrictive when changing positions during sleep or getting out of bed.

If you've now decided that you're after a completely different feel, and fancy some bounce rather than sink, then the innerspring hybrid Saatva Classic comes in three different firmnesses (and it needn’t be expensive either with frequent Saatva mattress sales). Elsewhere, the DreamCloud Luxury Hybrid provides a firmer feel without the sink-in sensation; check our DreamCloud Mattress review for more details, or see how the two compare in our Nectar vs DreamCloud face-off).

Ultimately though, with its 365-night trial and Forever Warranty, we feel confident in saying that the Nectar Mattress is a reliable and affordable gel memory model that works well for most sleepers. And with its year-long trial, you’ll have plenty of time to know whether it’s the right choice for your body and sleep needs.

First reviewed: February 2022

Read more:

Sony HT-A7000 Dolby Atmos Soundbar review
6:58 pm |

Author: admin | Category: Computers Gadgets Soundbars Televisions | Tags: , | Comments: Off

Editor's note

• Original review date: March 2022
• Current Sony flagship Dolby Atmos soundbar
• Launch price: $1,399 / £1,299 / AU$1,699
• Target price now: $999 / £1,299 / AU$1,699

Update: February 2024. The Sony HT-A7000 remains the company’s flagship soundbar, and the only all-in-one model equipped for 7.1.2-channel Dolby Atmos sound. It was initially pricey at launch, and remains so in the UK and Australia, though its price has seen regular drops in the US, with discounts from $1,399 to around $999 being common. That price makes it competitive with the Sonos Arc, the  5.0.2-channel flagship soundbar from Sonos. The Sony’s higher channel count, multiple HDMI inputs, and DTS:X support make it a superior option to the Arc, however, and the now under-$1,000 price, while still high, is a better value than at launch. The rest of this review remains as previously published.

One-minute review

The Sony HT-A7000 comes with a pedigree. It follows the Sony HT-ST5000 as the company’s new de facto flagship soundbar and it carries an air of distinction.

What helps elevate the HT-A7000 above its competitors is its integrated upfiring speakers that help it support true Dolby Atmos and DTS:X, with a sprinkling of Sony’s new 360 Reality Audio format thrown in, too. 

There are other niceties thrown in at this price - such as the two HDMI 2.1 ports that will allow you to connect both your PS5 and Xbox Series X to the soundbar - and it even has room to grow thanks to an optional subwoofer and rear surround speakers. 

At this price point we wish some of those optional extras were simply included in the box and that the height channels produced a more convincing soundstage, but what’s on offer is a powerful, room-filling soundbar that richly deserves a place amongst the best soundbars.

Price & release date

The Sony HT-A7000 Soundbar made its debut at the tail-end of 2021, effectively replacing the older Sony HT-ST5000 model that long held a position on our best soundbar list.

In terms of pricing, the Sony HT-A7000 comes in at $1,399 / £1,299 / AU$1,699  - and that’s just for the soundbar. If you want to add a subwoofer and rear speakers, that’s going to cost you an extra $300 / £449 / AU$599 and $350 / £449 / AU$649  respectively, depending on which of Sony’s two subwoofers you decide to use. (The more expensive subwoofer, the SA-SW5, costs $698 / ‎£699 / AU$899 by itself, so be prepared for that.)

For a soundbar, that’s a lot of money - especially if you plan on buying all the extras that go with it. Overall, that’s not a horrible price if this becomes your one home cinema purchase for the next decade, but most folks will want a more flexible option at this price point.

The Sony HT-A7000 Soundbar underneath a Sony TV.

(Image credit: Future)

Design

At roughly 51 inches long and three inches tall, the HT-A7000 is a pretty big ‘bar. It’s just the right size to fit underneath a Sony X95J TV or one of Sony’s new OLED TVs, but it could very easily block the IR sensor on TVs from other manufacturers or collide with the legs. 

In short, it’s a long bar and probably not the best partner for any screen below 55 inches.

The good news is that big ‘bars like these often pack big drivers to go inside of them - and that’s absolutely what’s going on here. Inside the HT-A7000 are two upfiring speakers for overhead sound, two beam tweeters and five front speakers and a subwoofer that’s in charge of handling the bass for a total output of 500W.

Covering all those speakers is a mish-mash of textures and materials. On the front is a metal grille that covers all the front-firing drivers and a small LED screen, while on the top you’ve got a fabric mesh covering the upfiring drivers. There’s also a glossy finish on the top where you can find the touch-capacitive control buttons. 

The LED screen certainly works well when you’re simply changing the volume, but it’s not the most helpful in showing you which format you’re working with: other soundbars will turn a certain color when they detect an Atmos signal or display it on the front LED. The A7000 does neither.

The included remote is straightforward to use, though you’ll be able to use your TV’s remote should you connect the soundbar via HDMI to your TV or AV receiver, which we highly recommend. 

The Sony HT-A7000 Soundbar underneath a Sony TV.

(Image credit: Future)

Features

If you have a TV with an eARC port, you should have next to no problem setting up the HT-A7000. It’s really as easy as plugging in the power cable and running an HDMI cable between the TV and the soundbar. 

That being said, if you want a more in-depth setup and calibration process, Sony makes that relatively simple by building a basic UI into the soundbar itself. 

The most basic step you can take to improve the sound quality of the soundbar is to run a basic room calibration test. This takes just 20 seconds and it will help the soundbar know how far away from walls it is and which channels need extra power. 

You can manually adjust those settings for yourself in the simple UI Sony provides, but most folks should be fine with just the automatic calibration. 

Also this UI is where you can select other sources for audio. The soundbar supports HDMI obviously, but also 3.5mm auxiliary, Bluetooth audio, USB devices, Spotify, Chromecast, Amazon Alexa and 360 Reality Audio via Deezer, Tidal and Amazon Music. It’s a very wide selection of sources, and allows you to have some flexibility in terms of what you want to connect. 

Speaking of music, Sony also included its DSEE Extreme upscaling tech in the soundbar that helps restore details lost in the wireless transmission process. It’s something we’ve seen in the company’s flagship WH-1000M4 headphones, but not in a soundbar. 

The Sony HT-A7000 Soundbar underneath a Sony TV.

(Image credit: Future)

Performance

By itself, the Sony HT-A7000 is capable of producing a 7.1.2-channel sound. While that sounds like a lot of sound output - and it certainly is - it’s mostly focused around the mid-range if you don’t go in and manually change the EQ. 

Out of the box, without any additional hardware hooked up, what you’ll hear is robust and clear dialogue. Throughout our testing, no matter the source, we were able to make out dialogue clearly, even when we changed the sound mode of the TV to something more dynamic, like, say the Cinema sound mode on a Sony TV.

The double woofers on the front of the bar do provide a bit of oomph - especially when you crank the volume up above the 60% mark - but they in no way replace what a discrete subwoofer can provide. The same can be said for the upfiring speakers and drivers responsible for surround sound that come off as a little weaker than what we’d like. 

We also noticed that the soundbar cut out once or twice during our two-week testing period. It would happen without rhyme or reason and would momentarily cause the audio to stop before resuming - however, it was certainly annoying whenever it happened.

In terms of stereo imaging and soundstage, there’s a lot to like about the HT-A7000 - it’s a very musically talented soundbar. Testing out some 360 Reality Audio music, you get a real room-filling sound with a clear idea of where all the instruments are located. 

Turning on some Spotify, we were impressed with the force of the soundbar and, again, that robust mid-range. Trebles could’ve been a little clearer and the bass - while easy to hear - just didn’t have the same depth that a separate sub can provide. 

Overall, we feel most folks will be pleased with the sound quality the soundbar provides, but there is obvious room for improvement for whatever Sony designs next. 

Should you buy the Sony HT-A7000 Soundbar?

The Sony HT-A7000 Soundbar underneath a Sony TV.

(Image credit: Future)

Buy it if… 

You want a full-range soundbar that can play Dolby Atmos content
While the height channels could stand to be a bit stronger, overall the A7000 is a powerful soundbar that hits most of the right notes. It gives you a bit of everything right out of the box, and then you can always add more oomph to the bass or surround channels by picking up additional hardware.

You have two HDMI 2.1 devices and you want to save some ports
One of the biggest gripes we’ve heard about some TVs supporting just one or two HDMI 2.1 ports is that one of those belongs to the eARC port on the TV. The HT-A7000 allows you to effectively use that one eARC port as two more HDMI 2.1 ports - which is a huge boon for folks who have two (or more) HDMI 2.1 devices that need to be plugged in. 

Don’t buy it if… 

You want a complete system in a single box
Unfortunately, if you want a complete system with a sub-woofer and surround units in a single box, the HT-A7000 isn’t for you. Yes, those things are available to buy separately, but they’re relatively expensive compared to some HTIB systems from other manufacturers.

You want the full Dolby Atmos effect from a soundbar
We’ve known for years that getting a full surround sound effect from a soundbar has been, well, difficult. As more manufacturers have figured out how to do it thanks to room calibration features, we’re now at the point where we’re seeing the same thing happen with upfiring Atmos speakers. They’re good - but they’re just not the same as discrete speakers. 

Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2 review
4:01 pm | March 24, 2022

Author: admin | Category: Computers Dash Cams Gadgets Vehicle Tech | Comments: Off

Editor's Note

• Original review date: June 2022
• Yet to be replaced
• Launch price: $129.99 / £119.99 / AU$229
• Official price now: $129.99 / £119.99 / AU$229

Update: February 2024. Released in September 2021, the Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2 remains our favorite dash cam for buyers on a budget. Of all the options on our list of the best dash cams, we think it offers the most bang for buck overall. You’ll need to look elsewhere for 4K footage and driver assistance features, but if you want a small, straightforward dash cam that’s easy to set up, the Mini 2 is an excellent choice. In our experience, the Mini 2 is a likely target for discounts in seasonal sales. During last November’s Cyber Monday event, for example, its price was reduced to $99.99 by retailers in the US and £99.99 in the UK, representing a meaningful saving. If you’re willing to wait until the next online sales event, such as Amazon’s July Prime Day, there’s a good chance you’ll be able to save money on the Mini 2. Alternatively, if you want an affordable dash cam setup with cameras facing front and rear, we suggest taking a look at the Miofive Dual Dash Cam.

If you want the smallest and more discreet dash cam on the market, then the Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2 is for you. Barely the size of a key fob, the Mini 2 forgoes features like a touchscreen display in favor of being so small it hides neatly behind your car’s rear-view mirror.

Despite its compact size, the Dash Cam Mini 2 records in Full HD at 30 frames per second through a 140-degree lens. This puts it a little behind other, larger members of the Garmin Dash Cam family, which shoot at 1440p through wider, 180-degree lenses. But we feel 1080p is still good enough for a dash cam, especially one that is this compact and competitively priced.

Sticking with design for now, the Dash Cam Mini 2 is remarkably compact. The front houses nothing more than the lens and a ball-and-socket joint which connects to a short arm. This then has an adhesive pad for sticking to the windscreen.

A hand holding the Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2 dash cam

(Image credit: Future)

We’re big fans of the magnetic mounts of other Garmin dash cams, but the compact plastic arm here still takes up very little windscreen space and works well. Given how small the Mini 2 is, we suspect most buyers will leave it permanently in place, and only remove it (by popping the ball-and-socket joint apart) when they want to move the camera to another car or access the microSD card.

Speaking of storage, Garmin doesn’t include a memory card in the box, so you’ll need to provide your own. This has to be at least 8GB and the camera supports cards up to 512GB, with Garmin recommending a Class-10 card or faster.

Image 1 of 2

The Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2 next to its box on a table

(Image credit: Future)
Image 2 of 2

The Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2 next to its box on a table

(Image credit: Future)

There are just two buttons on the Dash Cam Mini 2. One on the side switches audio recording on and off, while a button on the back saves the most recent section of footage. This button’s location makes it easy to quickly press if you spot an incident ahead. Footage is automatically saved when a collision is detected, but the button is useful for manually saving video of anything else you spot while driving.

The camera comes with a choice of USB cables, one short and one long, plus an adapter for powering the dash cam from a 12V lighter socket. Also included are a pair of adhesive windscreen mounts, making it easy to switch the camera between two vehicles.

The Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2 next to its box on a table

(Image credit: Future)

Garmin’s smartphone app is called Drive – it's free to download for iOS and Android, and is used to set the camera up. We had no issues connecting our phone to the dash cam – an area where other dash cams can slip up – and used the app to see a live view of the camera, adjust settings, update the firmware, and view recorded footage.

Once set up, there’s no need to use the app again, if you don’t want to. The dash cam quietly gets on with its job, and footage can easily be transferred to your computer or tablet from the microSD card. 

If connected to your phone over Wi-Fi, footage will be automatically uploaded to Garmin’s Vault online storage system. Recordings are stored for 24 hours for free. Or, for $4.99 / £4.99 a month, this time limit can be increased to seven days.

A hand holding a phone running the Garmin dash cam app

(Image credit: Garmin)

Video quality is very good, considering its size and price tag. It shoots 1080p Full HD with HDR and is captured at 30 frames per second through a 140-degree lens. Details like road signs and vehicle registration plates are clear, and footage remains sharp throughout varying lighting and weather conditions.

We’d have liked the lens to be a little wider, as 140 degrees is really the minimum we’d want from a dash cam. A wider lens would include a view to the sides of the car as well as straight ahead, but this is a relatively small complaint.

A further point against the Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2 is its lack of GPS. Instead, locational data can only be captured if the Mini 2 is synced with a Garmin dash cam that has GPS, via the Drive app. This feature, called Dash Cam Auto Sync, lets you have up to four Garmin dash cams recording at once. While four might be overkill for most motorists, the system makes it easy to pair front and rear cameras together.

A parking mode is available, but requires Garmin’s Constant Power Cable, sold separately, which hard-wires the Mini 2 to your car.

The Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2 mounted inside a windscreen

(Image credit: Future)

Audio recording is possible, and can be switched on or off with a button on the back of the dash cam. In our experience, this isn’t of much use when recording dash cam footage, and is something your passengers would likely prefer to be disabled.

As well as pressing the button, audio recording can be controlled by speaking to the dash cam. Garmin’s voice control system works pretty well, with the ‘hey Garmin’ command reliably getting its attention. You can then ask the camera to save footage, take a photo, or turn audio recording on/off.

Unlike other models in the Garmin Dash Cam series, there are no driver assistance features with the Mini 2. We don’t mind this, though, as we often find such features more annoying than they are useful.

Overall, the Dash Cam Mini 2 is hard to fault. Instead of overwhelming the user with a bunch of features they’ll seldom use, it is a tiny, simple product that just gets on with the job of being a quality dash cam, with zero distractions.

Should you buy the Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2?

The Garmin Dash Cam Mini 2 mounted inside a windshield

(Image credit: Garmin)

Buy it if...

Don't buy it if...

Next Page »